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Vision, judgment, and disagreement among economists

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  • David Colander

Abstract

David Colander has been writing about economic methodology for over 30 years, but he goes out of his way to emphasize that he does not see himself as a methodologist. His pragmatic methodology is applicable to what economists are doing and attempts to answer questions that all economists face as they go about their work. The articles collected in this volume are divided, with the first part providing a framework underlying Colander’s methodology and introducing Colander’s methodology for economic policy within that framework. Part two presents Colander’s view on the methodology for microeconomics, while part three looks at Colander’s methodology for macroeconomics. The book closes with discussions of broader issues.
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Suggested Citation

  • David Colander, 1994. "Vision, judgment, and disagreement among economists," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 43-56.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jecmet:v:1:y:1994:i:1:p:43-56
    DOI: 10.1080/13501789400000004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ronald G. Bodkin & Lawrence R. Klein & Kanta Marwah, 1991. "A History of Macroeconometric Model-Building," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 51.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anthony Randazzo & Jonathan Haidt, 2015. "The Moral Narratives of Economists," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 12(1), pages 49-57, January.
    2. Sascha Baghestanian & Sergey V. Popov, 2017. "Alma Mat(t)er(s): Determinants of Early Career Success in Economics," Economics Working Papers 17-02, Queen's Management School, Queen's University Belfast.
    3. Giuseppe Munda, 2013. "On the Foundations of Well-Being Economics and Policy," UHE Working papers 2013_01, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Departament d'Economia i Història Econòmica, Unitat d'Història Econòmica.
    4. Hendrik P. van Dalen, 2003. "Pluralism in Economics: A Public Good or a Public Bad?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-034/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 18 May 2004.
    5. Thomas Mayer, 2001. "The role of ideology in disagreements among economists: a quantitative analysis," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 253-273.

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