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Effects of a Sibship Extension to Foster Children on Children's School Enrolment: A Sibling Rivalry Analysis for Indonesia

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  • Karine Marazyan

Abstract

In this paper, we question whether and how the sibship extension to foster children, a common practice in many developing countries, affects children's school enrolment status. Based on Indonesian data, we show that children's school enrolment increases with the number of foster grandchildren in their sibship. Given that grandchildren fostering is associated with positive transfers from biological to host parents, this result reflects either a release of liquidity constraints in the host household or the uncommon preferences of host grandparents. Conversely, the proportion of other foster children in a sibship does not have any effect. The latter result's explanation depends on the reason children other than grandchildren are fostered.

Suggested Citation

  • Karine Marazyan, 2011. "Effects of a Sibship Extension to Foster Children on Children's School Enrolment: A Sibling Rivalry Analysis for Indonesia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(3), pages 497-518.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:47:y:2011:i:3:p:497-518
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2010.492859
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    7. Behrman, Jere R & Pollak, Robert A & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "Do Parents Favor Boys?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 27(1), pages 33-54, February.
    8. Donald Cox, 2007. "Biological Basics and the Economics of the Family," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 91-108, Spring.
    9. Kristin F. Butcher & Anne Case, 1994. "The Effect of Sibling Sex Composition on Women's Education and Earnings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(3), pages 531-563.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:wdevel:v:103:y:2018:i:c:p:311-322 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Asadullah, M. Niaz & Maliki,, 2018. "Madrasah for girls and private school for boys? The determinants of school type choice in rural and urban Indonesia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 96-111.
    3. Libois, François & Somville, Vincent, 2018. "Fertility, household size and poverty in Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 311-322.
    4. repec:spr:chinre:v:10:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12187-016-9406-y is not listed on IDEAS
    5. El Badaoui, Eliane & Mangiavacchi, Lucia, 2018. "Fostering, Child Welfare, and Ethnic Cultural Values," IZA Discussion Papers 11691, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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