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Human capital investments and family composition

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Abstract

We explore how human capital investment of a child is affected by the number and the gender of his/her siblings. We test for two alternative explanations : competition for scarce resources versus direct interactions between siblings. We provide an empirical application using Brazilian data.

Suggested Citation

  • Antoine Bommier & Sylvie Lambert, 2003. "Human capital investments and family composition," Research Unit Working Papers 0313, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
  • Handle: RePEc:lea:leawpi:0313
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    Cited by:

    1. Mihails Hazans & Ija Trapeznikova, 2006. "Access to Secondary Education in Albania: Incentives, Obstacles, and Policy Spillovers," SSE Riga/BICEPS Research Papers 2006-1, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies (BICEPS);Stockholm School of Economics in Riga (SSE Riga).
    2. Kelly Jones, 2014. "Growing Up Together: Cohort Composition and Child Investment," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(1), pages 229-255, February.
    3. Nathalie Picard & François-Charles Wolff, 2010. "Measuring educational inequalities: a method and an application to Albania," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 989-1023, June.
    4. Christelle Dumas, 2004. "Impact de la structure familiale sur les décisions parentales de mise au travail des enfants : le cas du Brésil," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 12(1), pages 71-99.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human capital investment; sibling rivalry; child labour;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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