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Do Changes in the Labour Market Take Families Out of Poverty? Determinants of Exiting Poverty in Brazilian Metropolitan Regions

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  • Ana Flavia Machado
  • Rafael Perez Ribas

Abstract

Using survival models, we test whether short-term changes in the labour market affect poverty duration. Data are from the Brazilian Monthly Employment Survey. Such a monthly dataset permits more accurate estimations of events than using annual data, but its panel follows households for a short period. Then methods that control for both right- and left-censoring should be used. The results are as follows: households with zero income are not those with the lowest chances of exiting; changes in aggregate unemployment do not affect poverty duration; and increasing wages in the informal sector has a negative effect on poverty duration.

Suggested Citation

  • Ana Flavia Machado & Rafael Perez Ribas, 2010. "Do Changes in the Labour Market Take Families Out of Poverty? Determinants of Exiting Poverty in Brazilian Metropolitan Regions," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(9), pages 1503-1522.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:46:y:2010:i:9:p:1503-1522
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380903318079
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Anna Christina D'Addio & Michael Rosholm, "undated". "Left-Censoring in Duration Data: Theory and Applications," Economics Working Papers 2002-5, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Haagh, Louise, 2011. "Working Life, Well-Being and Welfare Reform: Motivation and Institutions Revisited," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 450-473, March.
    2. Camargo, Fernanda S. & Takasago, Milene & Guilhoto, Joaquim José Martins & Farias, Aquiles Rocha de & Imori, Denise & Mollo, Maria de Lourdes Rollemberg & Andrade, Joaquim Pinto de, 2008. "O turismo e a economia brasileira: uma discussão da matriz de insumo-produto
      [Tourism and the Brazilian economy: a discussion about the input-output matrix]
      ," MPRA Paper 54038, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Luis Beccaria & Roxana Maurizio & Ana Fernández & Paula Monsalvo & Mariana Álvarez, 2013. "Urban poverty and labor market dynamics in five Latin American countries: 2003–2008," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 11(4), pages 555-580, December.
    4. GRIES, Thomas & PALNAU, Irene, 2016. "Distress Beyond Poverty: Spatial Patterns And Geographic Aspects Of Vulnerability In Brazil," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 16(2), pages 53-70.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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