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Environmental responsibility and policy in a two-country dynamic input-output model

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  • Rutger Hoekstra
  • Marco Janssen

Abstract

Increased spatial dependency of economic activities, as well as spatial differentiation of production and consumption, has implications for environmental policy. One of the issues that has gained importance is the responsibility for the emissions from products that cross national boundaries during the environmental policy's lifetime. This paper discusses the different ethical views of environmental responsibility. Furthermore, the policy measures that are associated with the different viewpoints are analyzed in a novel dynamic two-country two-sector dynamic input-output model. A numerical example is modeled to assess taxing schemes that are based on these ethical viewpoints. The results show that a tax on the 'embodied' environmental pressure, which is generally viewed as ethically preferable, is less effective that the current policy of taxing consumers of products. Our discussion however shows that these results are very dependent on the model structure and initial parameters that are used. Nevertheless, the model illustrates that policies that are based on ethically superior standpoints may have detrimental distortionary effects in the dynamic setting.

Suggested Citation

  • Rutger Hoekstra & Marco Janssen, 2006. "Environmental responsibility and policy in a two-country dynamic input-output model," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 61-84.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:18:y:2006:i:1:p:61-84
    DOI: 10.1080/09535310500440894
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    Cited by:

    1. Turner, Karen & Lenzen, Manfred & Wiedmann, Thomas & Barrett, John, 2007. "Examining the global environmental impact of regional consumption activities -- Part 1: A technical note on combining input-output and ecological footprint analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 37-44, April.
    2. Rodrigues, João & Domingos, Tiago, 2008. "Consumer and producer environmental responsibility: Comparing two approaches," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2-3), pages 533-546, June.
    3. George Halkos & Kyriaki Tsilika, 2016. "Dynamic Input–Output Models in Environmental Problems: A Computational Approach with CAS Software," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 47(3), pages 489-497, March.
    4. Tarancón, Miguel Angel & del Río, Pablo & Callejas Albiñana, Fernando, 2010. "Assessing the influence of manufacturing sectors on electricity demand. A cross-country input-output approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 1900-1908, April.
    5. Halkos, George & Tzeremes, Nickolaos, 2011. "Does the Kyoto Protocol Agreement matters? An environmental efficiency analysis," MPRA Paper 30652, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Li, You & Hewitt, C.N., 2008. "The effect of trade between China and the UK on national and global carbon dioxide emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1907-1914, June.
    7. Perobelli, Fernando Salgueiro & Faria, Weslem Rodrigues & Vale, Vinicius de Almeida, 2015. "The increase in Brazilian household income and its impact on CO2 emissions: Evidence for 2003 and 2009 from input–output tables," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 228-239.
    8. Wiedmann, Thomas, 2009. "A first empirical comparison of energy Footprints embodied in trade -- MRIO versus PLUM," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 1975-1990, May.
    9. Tarancón, Miguel Ángel & del Río, Pablo & Callejas, Fernando, 2011. "Determining the responsibility of manufacturing sectors regarding electricity consumption. The Spanish case," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 46-52.
    10. McGregor, Peter G. & Swales, J. Kim & Turner, Karen, 2008. "The CO2 'trade balance' between Scotland and the rest of the UK: Performing a multi-region environmental input-output analysis with limited data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(4), pages 662-673, July.
    11. Tarancón Morán, Miguel Ángel & del Ri­o, Pablo & Albiñana, Fernando Callejas, 2008. "Tracking the genealogy of CO2 emissions in the electricity sector: An intersectoral approach applied to the Spanish case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1915-1926, June.
    12. Wiedmann, Thomas & Lenzen, Manfred & Turner, Karen & Barrett, John, 2007. "Examining the global environmental impact of regional consumption activities -- Part 2: Review of input-output models for the assessment of environmental impacts embodied in trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 15-26, February.

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