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Structural analysis of international trade: Environmental impacts of Norway

  • Glen Peters
  • Edgar Hertwich

Final demand purchases initiate production processes that ultimately lead to environmental impacts. With the increase in international trade, many production processes occur outside of the country of final consumption. Whilst several studies have evaluated the pollution embodied in consumption and trade flows, few studies have investigated the structural linkages between domestic consumption and production in foreign regions. In this article we apply three complementary approaches to study the production network leading from the Norwegian economy to domestic and international environmental impacts: (1) the consumption perspective identifies final demand purchases that produce environmental impacts; (2) the production perspective identifies the production processes generating the pollution for a given demand; and (3) structural path analysis is used to provide the linkages between the global production networks linking consumption and production. We find that the three approaches provide different, but complementary information. For policy to focus on both sustainable consumption and production, all three approaches are required to fully identify environmentally important sectors in an economy.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economic Systems Research.

Volume (Year): 18 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 155-181

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:18:y:2006:i:2:p:155-181
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