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Dynamics of Trade Integration and Technological Convergence

  • Robert Stehrer

The issue of the impact of trade on economic performance and labour markets has been intensively discussed in recent literature on trade liberalization and globalization, where the debate was mainly about identifying the relative impact of trade and technology. The bulk of the existing literature in this area employs, almost without exception, a static Heckscher-Ohlin framework that seems not to be a suitable tool for analysing the ongoing dynamics. This paper presents a dynamic multi-sectoral framework with heterogenous labour to explore the issue of trade liberalization and sectoral catching-up in productivity levels. The model is basically an input-output framework with Schumpeterian features; the latter are modelled as the impact of transitory rents that result from uneven productivity growth and technological catching-up upon the price and quantity systems of the trading economies. Relative productivity and wage rate dynamics across sectors determine the comparative costs and the dynamics of trade specialization. In the Appendix, the equilibrium solutions of the model are derived.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economic Systems Research.

Volume (Year): 14 (2002)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 219-244

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:14:y:2002:i:3:p:219-244
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  1. Edward E. Leamer, 1994. "Trade, Wages and Revolving Door Ideas," NBER Working Papers 4716, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Wood Júnior, Thomaz, 1995. "Workers," RAE - Revista de Administração de Empresas, FGV-EAESP Escola de Administração de Empresas de São Paulo (Brazil), vol. 35(2), January.
  3. Landesmann, Michael A. & Stehrer, Robert, 2001. "Convergence patterns and switchovers in comparative advantage," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 399-423, December.
  4. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521484619 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Robert Stehrer & Julia Wörz, 2003. "Technological convergence and trade patterns," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 139(2), pages 191-219, June.
  6. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Griliches, Zvi, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-97, May.
  7. Goodwin, Richard M, 1986. "Swinging along the Turnpike with von Neumann and Sraffa," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 203-10, September.
  8. Adrian Wood, 1995. "How Trade Hurt Unskilled Workers," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 57-80, Summer.
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