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As fontes da determinação da escolaridade dos trabalhadores da indústria de transformação brasileira


  • Rafael Camargo de Pauli


  • Luciano Nakabashi

    () (Department of Economics, Universidade Federal do Paraná)

  • Armando Vaz Sampaio

    () (Department of Economics, Universidade Federal do Paraná)


In this article, we analyze the swings sources of demand for labor force, according to the level of schooling, in the Brazilian manufacturing industry, in the 1994-2008 period of time. We consider two theories to explain these swings sources: the Heckscher-Ohlin Theorem (H-O) and the ability bias hypothesis. In the empirical analysis, we make use of decomposition analysis to verify which one of them best fits the data employed. The results of the empirical analysis give little support to the ability bias hypothesis when we utilize higher education labor force. Additionally, we find out that the international trade forces emphasized by the H-O Theorem are relevant in the Brazilian economy. However, it was verified that the increase of intermediate level of education labor force supply was the main cause of schooling increase in the manufacturing industry labor force.

Suggested Citation

  • Rafael Camargo de Pauli & Luciano Nakabashi & Armando Vaz Sampaio, 2010. "As fontes da determinação da escolaridade dos trabalhadores da indústria de transformação brasileira," Working Papers 0098, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fup:wpaper:0098 Note: Creation Date corresponds to the year in which the paper was published on the Department of Economics website. The paper may have been written a small number of months before its publication date.

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    manufacturing industry; Heckscher-Ohlin Theorem; ability bias hypothesis; labor force qualification;

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure

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