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Reported gross income and marginal tax rates: estimation of the behavioural reactions of Spanish taxpayers

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  • José Félix Sanz-Sanz
  • María Arrazola-Vacas
  • Nuria Rueda-López
  • Desiderio Romero-Jordán

Abstract

This article estimates, for the Spanish personal income tax, the elasticity of reported gross income to marginal tax rates. The identification of this elasticity has been performed using the reform approved by Law 35/2006, which came into force in January 2007. The elasticities obtained suggest the existence of important efficiency costs, with significant regional differences. The average elasticity estimated for Spain as a whole is 0.676. However, this elasticity is highly dispersed throughout the Spanish administrative regions, which indicates the unequal power of distortion of the tax. Thus, households whose principal source of income is salary display an elasticity of 0.337, compared to 0.682 for households whose main income source comes from business or savings. Lastly, a positive correlation is also detected between elasticity and income level: an elasticity of 3.6 is reached for taxpayers with an annual gross income exceeding 100000€.

Suggested Citation

  • José Félix Sanz-Sanz & María Arrazola-Vacas & Nuria Rueda-López & Desiderio Romero-Jordán, 2015. "Reported gross income and marginal tax rates: estimation of the behavioural reactions of Spanish taxpayers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(5), pages 466-484, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:47:y:2015:i:5:p:466-484
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2014.972548
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Neisser, Carina, 2017. "The elasticity of taxable income: A meta-regression analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-032, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    2. repec:zbw:ifweej:201867 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Díaz-Caro, Carlos & Onrubia, Jorge, 2018. "How do taxable income responses to marginal tax rates differ by sex, marital status and age? Evidence from Spanish dual income tax," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 12, pages 1-25.
    4. Sanz-Sanz, José Félix, 2016. "The Laffer curve in schedular multi-rate income taxes with non-genuine allowances: An application to Spain," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 42-56.
    5. Neisser, Carina, 2018. "The Elasticity of Taxable Income: A Meta-Regression Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 11958, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Carina Neisser, 2017. "The elasticity of taxable income: A meta-regression analysis," Working Papers 2017/10, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    7. Sophia Igdalov & Roni Frish & Noam Zussman, 2017. "The Wage Response to a Reduction in Income Tax Rates: The 2003–2009 Tax Reform in Israel," Bank of Israel Working Papers 2017.14, Bank of Israel.

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