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A note on Romer's openness-inflation relation: the responsiveness of AS and AD to economic openness and monetary policy

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  • Jim Granato
  • Melody Lo
  • M. C. Sunny Wong

Abstract

Temple (2002) empirically challenges Romer's (1993) negative openness-inflation relation on empirical grounds. This article links economic openness to the slopes of aggregate supply (AS) and aggregate demand (AD) to explain why the openness-inflation relation can be ambiguous. Starting with a widely used assumption initiated by Romer (1993) that more open economies face greater output inflation tradeoffs, we demonstrate that greater output-inflation tradeoffs in more open economies (reflected in the steeper AS) induce policymakers to adopt more aggressive optimal monetary policy (reflected in the flatter AD). Empirical results from 15 developed countries' data support our theoretical explanation on the recent empirical failure in finding the negative openness-inflation relation.

Suggested Citation

  • Jim Granato & Melody Lo & M. C. Sunny Wong, 2007. "A note on Romer's openness-inflation relation: the responsiveness of AS and AD to economic openness and monetary policy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(2), pages 191-197.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:2:p:191-197 DOI: 10.1080/00036840500427627
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Rose, Andrew K., 1996. "A panel project on purchasing power parity: Mean reversion within and between countries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 209-224.
    2. Temple, Jonathan, 2002. "Openness, Inflation, and the Phillips Curve: A Puzzle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(2), pages 450-468, May.
    3. M. F. Bleaney, 1999. "The Disappearing Openness-Inflation Relationship; A Cross-Country Analysis of Inflation Rates," IMF Working Papers 99/161, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Eric M. Leeper & Jennifer E. Roush, 2003. "Putting "M" back in monetary policy," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 1217-1264.
    5. Magda Kandil, 1999. "The asymmetric stabilizing effects of price flexibility: historical evidence and implications," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(7), pages 825-839.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jafari Samimi, Ahmad & Ghaderi, Saman & Hosseinzadeh, Ramezan & Nademi, Younes, 2012. "Openness and inflation: New empirical panel data evidence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 573-577.
    2. Jafari Samimi, Ahmad & Ghaderi, Saman & Sanginabadi, Bahram, 2012. "The Effects of Openness and Globalization on Inflation: An ARDL Bounds Test Approach," MPRA Paper 52407, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Jafari Samimi, Ahmad & Ghaderi, Saman & Sanginabadi, Bahram, 2011. "Openness and Inflation in Iran," MPRA Paper 52408, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Carla Ysusi, 2009. "Analysis of the Dynamics of Mexican Inflation Using Wavelets," Working Papers 2009-09, Banco de México.
    5. Sikdar, Asaduzzaman & Kundu, Nobinkhor & Khan, Zakir Saadullah, 2013. "Trade openness and inflation: A test of Romer hypothesis for Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 65244, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 16 Oct 2013.

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