IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v36y2004i8p781-791.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Credits and non-interest rate determinants of loan demand: a Spanish case study

Author

Listed:
  • J. Manrique
  • K. Ojah

Abstract

This article uses bivariate probit analysis to model the potential relationship between the condition of being credit-unconstrained and holding loans as well as to ascertain determinants of a household being credit-unconstrained and likely holding consumer and real-estate loans. It documents that family size, education, permanent and transitory incomes, among others, affect Spanish households' desire and capacity to hold loans. Furthermore, these factors were found to affect demands for real-estate and consumer loans differently. In general, the above and other results from this research provide insights that would interest credit consumers, credit suppliers, and policy makers in Spain.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Manrique & K. Ojah, 2004. "Credits and non-interest rate determinants of loan demand: a Spanish case study," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(8), pages 781-791.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:8:p:781-791 DOI: 10.1080/0003684042000229514
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0003684042000229514
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cox, Donald & Jappelli, Tullio, 1990. "Credit Rationing and Private Transfers: Evidence from Survey Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(3), pages 445-454, August.
    2. Davies, A J & Weber, G, 1991. "Credit and British consumers: some micro evidence," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 12(2), pages 61-84, May.
    3. Jappelli, Tullio & Pagano, Marco, 1999. "The Welfare Effects of Liquidity Constraints," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(3), pages 410-430, July.
    4. Cox, Donald & Jappelli, Tullio, 1993. "The Effect of Borrowing Constraints on Consumer Liabilities," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 25(2), pages 197-213, May.
    5. Jappelli, Tullio & Pagano, Marco, 1989. "Consumption and Capital Market Imperfections: An International Comparison," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1088-1105, December.
    6. Breslaw, Jon & Irvine, Ian & Rahman, Abdul, 1996. "Instrument Choice: The Demand for Mortgages in Canada," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 282-302, May.
    7. Bacchetta, Philippe & Gerlach, Stefan, 1997. "Consumption and credit constraints: International evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 207-238, October.
    8. Jones Lawrence D., 1993. "The Demand for Home Mortgage Debt," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 10-28, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Christoph Kneiding & Alexander S. Kritikos, 2013. "Funding self-employment -- the role of consumer credit," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(13), pages 1741-1749, May.
    2. Wiboonpongse, Aree & Sriboonchitta, Songsak & Chaovanapoonphol, Yaovarate, 2006. "The Demand for Loans for Major Rice in the Upper North of Thailand," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25303, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Li, Rui & Li, Qinghai & Huang, Shaoan & Zhu, Xi, 2013. "The credit rationing of Chinese rural households and its welfare loss: An investigation based on panel data," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 17-27.
    4. E. Pastrapa & C. Apostolopoulos, 2015. "Estimating Determinants of Borrowing: Evidence from Greece," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 210-223, June.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:8:p:781-791. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.