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Consumption and Credit Constraints : International Evidence

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  • Philippe BACCHETTA
  • Stefan GERLACH

Abstract

If some consumers are liquidity-constrained, aggregate consumption should be `excessively sensitive' to credit conditions as well as to income. Moreover, the `excess sensitivity' may vary over time. Using data for the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan and France, we find a substantial impact of credit aggregates on consumption in all countries considered. Moreover, the borrowing/lending wedge is a significant determinant of consumption in the United States, Canada and Japan. Using extended Kalman filtering techniques, we show that the excess sensitivity varies over time, with a clear tendency to decline in the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Philippe BACCHETTA & Stefan GERLACH, 1997. "Consumption and Credit Constraints : International Evidence," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'économie 9707, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, Département d’économie.
  • Handle: RePEc:lau:crdeep:9707
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Antzoulatos, Angelos A., 1996. "Consumer credit and consumption forecasts," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 439-453, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumption; credit; liquidity constraints; Kalman filter;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers

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