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Disaggregated wage curves in the United States: evidence from panel data of young workers

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  • Jarkko Turunen

Abstract

The paper presents wage curve results disaggregated over time, by individual characteristics, occupations, industries and regions in the United States, using a panel data set of young workers. The results suggest that instead of a strong aggregate wage curve there are a number of different wage curves over time, and for different worker groups. The slope of the aggregate wage curve varies over time, with the strongest wage curves in the late 1980s. Wage curves exist for most labour market groups: the wages of the least educated, Hispanics, those in relatively low-skill occupations or service industries are most sensitive to changes in unemployment. Wages of government workers and those in the mining industry increase with unemployment. Finally, wage curves are steepest in the western states.

Suggested Citation

  • Jarkko Turunen, 1998. "Disaggregated wage curves in the United States: evidence from panel data of young workers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(12), pages 1665-1677.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:12:p:1665-1677
    DOI: 10.1080/000368498324733
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Blanchflower & Richard Freeman, 1990. "Going different ways: Unionism in the US and other advanced OECD CountriesF," CEP Discussion Papers dp0005, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sergio Destefanis & Giovanni Pica, 2010. "It’s wages, it’s hours, it’s the Italian wage curve," CSEF Working Papers 247, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    2. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald, 2005. "The Wage Curve Reloaded," NBER Working Papers 11338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Kåre Johansen, 2002. "Regional Wage Curves Empirical Evidence from Norway," Working Paper Series 0302, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    4. Fredrik Carlsen & Kåre Johansen & Knut RØed, 2006. "Wage Formation, Regional Migration and Local Labour Market Tightness," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(4), pages 423-444, August.
    5. Johnes, Geraint, 2007. "The wage curve revisited: Estimates from a UK panel," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(3), pages 414-420, March.
    6. Tuomas Pekkarinen, 2001. "The wage curve : evidence from the Finnish metal industry panel data," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 51-60, Spring.
    7. Esteban Sanroma Melendez & Raul Ramos Lobo, 2003. "Wage curves for Spain. Evidence from the family budget survey," Working Papers in Economics 101, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    8. Campbell III, Carl M., 2008. "An efficiency wage approach to reconciling the wage curve and the Phillips curve," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1388-1415, December.
    9. Carlsen, Fredrik & Johansen, Kare, 2005. "Regional wages and subjective measures of employment opportunities," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 377-400, May.
    10. Ana Barufi & Eduardo Haddad & Peter Nijkamp, 2016. "A comprehensive analysis of the wage curve in Brazil: Non-linearities, urban size, and the spatial dimension," ERSA conference papers ersa16p279, European Regional Science Association.
    11. Victor Montuenga & Inmaculada Garcia, 2011. "The wage dynamics in Spain: evidence from individual data," ERSA conference papers ersa11p585, European Regional Science Association.
    12. Víctor M. Montuenga-Gómez & José M. Ramos-Parreño, 2005. "Reconciling the Wage Curve and the Phillips Curve," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(5), pages 735-765, December.
    13. Sanroma, Esteban & Ramos, Raul, 2000. "The Spanish Wage Curve: Evidence From The 1990-91 Epf Survey," ERSA conference papers ersa00p219, European Regional Science Association.
    14. Barth, Erling & Bratsberg, Bernt & Naylor, Robin A. & Raaum, Oddbjørn, 2002. "Explaining Variations in Wage Curves: Theory and Evidence," Memorandum 03/2002, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    15. Montuenga, Victor & Garcia, Inmaculada & Fernandez, Melchor, 2003. "Wage flexibility: evidence from five EU countries based on the wage curve," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 169-174, February.
    16. Inmaculada Garcia-Mainar & Victor Montuenga-Gomez, 2003. "The Spanish Wage Curve: 1994-1996," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(9), pages 929-945.
    17. Sanz-de-Galdeano, Anna & Turunen, Jarkko, 2006. "The euro area wage curve," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 93-98, July.

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