IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cep/cepdps/dp0005.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Going different ways: Unionism in the US and other advanced OECD CountriesF

Author

Listed:
  • David Blanchflower
  • Richard Freeman

Abstract

In this paper we compare the changing pattern of unionization in OECD countries, review existing evidence, and present new information on cross-country differences in union/non-union differentials in labour market outcomes, largely from the micro data files of the International Social Survey Programme cross-country surveys of 1985-1987. Our analysis shows that American unions have a larger effect on wages, but not on other outcomes, than unions in other countries. We argue that the high union wage premium in the US contributed to the decline in US union density and to the consequent divergence of the US industrial relations system from those in most OECD countries. Looking to the future, our findings suggest that US unions must make major innovations in their tactics and policies to regain a position of strength in the private sector and that the nation will have to develop new industrial relations institutions to avoid the Congress and the judiciary intervening frequently in workplace decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • David Blanchflower & Richard Freeman, 1990. "Going different ways: Unionism in the US and other advanced OECD CountriesF," CEP Discussion Papers dp0005, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0005
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Henrekson, Magnus & Johansson, Dan, 2010. "Firm Growth, Institutions and Structural Transformation," Working Paper Series 820, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    2. Corneo, Giacomo & Lucifora, Claudio, 1997. "Wage formation under union threat effects: Theory and empirical evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 265-292, September.
    3. John Schmitt, 1993. "The Changing Structure of Male Earnings in Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0122, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Thomas Kochan & Marc Weinstein, 1994. "Recent Developments in US Industrial Relations," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 32(4), pages 483-504, December.
    5. Jarkko Turunen, 1998. "Disaggregated wage curves in the United States: evidence from panel data of young workers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(12), pages 1665-1677.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0005. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.