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Structural reforms and the benefits of the enlarged EU internal market: still much to be gained


  • Jens Matthias Arnold
  • Andreas Worgotter


In the light of recent calls for additional structural reforms in Europe, this article looks at the role that a reduction of remaining barriers for integration and competition in the EU internal market can play in this context. This article presents new estimates of the likely impact of product market reform on labour productivity in old and new EU member countries, with a particular focus on network industries, professional services and retail trade. These estimates reveal that labour productivity could be boosted by an average of 10% over a time horizon of 10 years, in reward for a reform agenda that would align the stringency of anti-competitive regulation in services sectors to European best practice across all countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Jens Matthias Arnold & Andreas Worgotter, 2011. "Structural reforms and the benefits of the enlarged EU internal market: still much to be gained," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(13), pages 1231-1235.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:18:y:2011:i:13:p:1231-1235 DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2010.532096

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Marianne Baxter & Michael A. Kouparitsas, 2006. "What Can Account for Fluctuations in the Terms of Trade?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(1), pages 63-86, May.
    2. Fátima Cardoso & Paulo Soares Esteves, 2008. "What is behind the recent evolution of Portuguese terms of trade?," Working Papers w200805, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    3. Lloyd, P. J. & Procter, R. G., 1983. "Commodity decomposition of export-import instability : New Zealand," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1-2), pages 41-57.
    4. Cashin, Paul & McDermott, C. John & Pattillo, Catherine, 2004. "Terms of trade shocks in Africa: are they short-lived or long-lived?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 727-744, April.
    5. Blattman, Christopher & Hwang, Jason & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2007. "Winners and losers in the commodity lottery: The impact of terms of trade growth and volatility in the Periphery 1870-1939," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 156-179, January.
    6. Loening, Josef L. & Durevall, Dick & Birru, Yohannes A., 2009. "Inflation dynamics and food prices in an agricultural economy : the case of Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4969, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fabrizio Coricelli & Andreas Wörgötter, 2012. "Structural Change and the Current Account: The Case of Germany," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 940, OECD Publishing.
    2. repec:voj:journl:v:64:y:2017:i:4:p:383-400 is not listed on IDEAS

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