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Inequality in a global economy: evidence from Germany

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  • Gregor Hesse

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Abstract

In the wake of the Melitz (Econometrica 71(6):1695–1725, 2003 ) model of heterogeneous firms in international trade, new theoretical models arose that try to assess the impact of trade on wage inequality within sectors, a feature that neoclassical trade theory cannot sufficiently explain. Based on the predictions of Helpman et al. (Econometrica 78(4):1239–1283, 2010 ), we use the LIAB, a German linked employer–employee panel dataset, in order to provide empirical evidence that wage inequality first increases and then decreases with gradual trade liberalization. Copyright Kiel Institute 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Gregor Hesse, 2015. "Inequality in a global economy: evidence from Germany," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 151(4), pages 803-820, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:weltar:v:151:y:2015:i:4:p:803-820
    DOI: 10.1007/s10290-015-0225-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Card & Jörg Heining & Patrick Kline, 2013. "Workplace Heterogeneity and the Rise of West German Wage Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(3), pages 967-1015.
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    4. Gabriel Felbermayr & Andreas Hauptmann & Hans-Jörg Schmerer, 2014. "International Trade and Collective Bargaining Outcomes: Evidence from German Employer–Employee Data," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 116(3), pages 820-837, July.
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    6. Hartmut Egger & Udo Kreickemeier, 2017. "Firm Heterogeneity and the Labor Market Effects of Trade Liberalization," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: International Trade and Labor Markets Welfare, Inequality and Unemployment, chapter 10, pages 265-306 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    7. Elhanan Helpman & Oleg Itskhoki & Stephen Redding, 2010. "Inequality and Unemployment in a Global Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(4), pages 1239-1283, July.
    8. Bernd Fitzenberger & Aderonke Osikominu & Robert Völter, 2006. "Imputation Rules to Improve the Education Variable in the IAB Employment Subsample," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 126(3), pages 405-436.
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    Keywords

    Wage inequality; International trade; Linked employer-employee data; F12; F16; E24;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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