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Trade, Labor Market Frictions, and Residual Wage Inequality across Worker Groups

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  • Pravin Krishna
  • Jennifer P. Poole
  • Mine Zeynep Senses

Abstract

Using a matched employer-employee data set, we study the effects of trade liberalization on wage dispersion in Brazil across heterogeneous worker groups, keeping in mind that the assignment of workers to firms may be non-random and determined by the time-invariant productivity of workers specific to the firms with which they are matched. We find differential effects of trade reform on residual wage inequality across worker groups. High education workers experience greater increases in wage dispersion relative to low education workers following trade liberalization. This finding is broadly consistent with the theoretical predictions that emerge from models with heterogeneous firms, heterogeneous workers, and labor market frictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Pravin Krishna & Jennifer P. Poole & Mine Zeynep Senses, 2012. "Trade, Labor Market Frictions, and Residual Wage Inequality across Worker Groups," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 417-423, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:417-23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eric A. Verhoogen, 2008. "Trade, Quality Upgrading, and Wage Inequality in the Mexican Manufacturing Sector," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(2), pages 489-530.
    2. Elhanan Helpman & Oleg Itskhoki & Stephen Redding, 2010. "Inequality and Unemployment in a Global Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(4), pages 1239-1283, July.
    3. Davis, Donald R. & Harrigan, James, 2011. "Good jobs, bad jobs, and trade liberalization," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 26-36, May.
    4. Davidson, Carl & Matusz, Steven J. & Shevchenko, Andrei, 2008. "Globalization and firm level adjustment with imperfect labor markets," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 295-309, July.
    5. Krishna, Pravin & Poole, Jennifer P. & Senses, Mine Zeynep, 2014. "Wage Effects of Trade Reform with Endogenous Worker Mobility," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 239-252.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Carrère, Céline & Grujovic, Anja & Robert-Nicoud, Frédéric, 2015. "Trade and frictional unemployment in the global economy," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 66490, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Jiaochen Liang & Stephan Goetz, 2016. "Self-employment and trade shock mitigation," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 45-56, January.
    3. Dauth, Wolfgang & Findeisen, Sebastian & Suedekum, Jens, 2016. "Adjusting to globalization - Evidence from worker-establishment matches in Germany," DICE Discussion Papers 205, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    4. Gregor Hesse, 2015. "Inequality in a global economy: evidence from Germany," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 151(4), pages 803-820, November.
    5. Javed Iqbal & Misbah Nosheen & Syed Nawab Haider Naqvi, 2015. "Trade Shocks and Labour Adjustment: Evidence from Pakistan’s Manufacturing Industries," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 54(3), pages 197-214.
    6. Goel, Manisha, 2017. "Inequality Between and Within Skill Groups: The Curious Case of India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 153-176.
    7. Alexander M. Danzer & Robert Grundke, 2016. "Coerced Labor in the Cotton Sector: How Global Commodity Prices (Don't) Transmit to the Poor," CESifo Working Paper Series 5937, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. repec:gnv:wpaper:unige:77631 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Jiaochen Liang & Stephan J. Goetz, 2016. "Self-employment and trade shock mitigation," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 45-56, January.
    10. Alexandre Gazaniol & Catherine Laffineur, 2015. "Does Outward Foreign Direct Investment affect domestic real wages? An investigation using French micro-data," FIW Working Paper series 155, FIW.

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