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Fractional integration versus level shifts: the case of realized asset correlations

  • Philip Bertram

    ()

  • Robinson Kruse

    ()

  • Philipp Sibbertsen

    ()

Long memory has been widely documented for realized financial market volatility. As a novelty, we consider daily realized asset correlations and we investigate whether the observed persistence is (i) due to true long memory (i.e. fractional integration) or (ii) artificially generated by some structural break processes. These two phenomena are difficult to be distinguished in practice. Our empirical results strongly indicate that the hyperbolic decay of the autocorrelation functions of pair-wise realized correlation series is indeed not driven by a truly fractionally integrated process. This finding is robust against user specific parameter choices in the applied test statistic and holds for all 15 considered time series. As a next step, we apply simple models with deterministic level shifts. When selecting the number of breaks, estimating the breakpoints and the corresponding structural break models we find a substantial degree of co-movement between the realized correlation series hinting at co-breaking. The estimated structural break models are interpreted in the light of the historic economic and financial development. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00362-013-0513-2
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Statistical Papers.

Volume (Year): 54 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 977-991

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Handle: RePEc:spr:stpapr:v:54:y:2013:i:4:p:977-991
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