IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/pharme/v34y2016i2d10.1007_s40273-015-0343-2.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Realising the Value of Linked Data to Health Economic Analyses of Cancer Care: A Case Study of Cancer 2015

Author

Listed:
  • Paula K. Lorgelly

    () (15 Innovation Walk, Monash University)

  • Brett Doble

    (15 Innovation Walk, Monash University)

  • Rachel J. Knott

    (15 Innovation Walk, Monash University)

Abstract

Abstract There is a growing appetite for large complex databases that integrate a range of personal, socio-demographic, health, genetic and financial information on individuals. It has been argued that ‘Big Data’ will provide the necessary catalyst to advance both biomedical research and health economics and outcomes research. However, it is important that we do not succumb to being data rich but information poor. This paper discusses the benefits and challenges of building Big Data, analysing Big Data and making appropriate inferences in order to advance cancer care, using Cancer 2015 (a prospective, longitudinal, genomic cohort study in Victoria, Australia) as a case study. Cancer 2015 has been linked to State and Commonwealth reimbursement databases that have known limitations. This partly reflects the funding arrangements in Australia, a country with both public and private provision, including public funding of private healthcare, and partly the legislative frameworks that govern data linkage. Additionally, linkage is not without time delays and, as such, achieving a contemporaneous database is challenging. Despite these limitations, there is clear value in using linked data and creating Big Data. This paper describes the linked Cancer 2015 dataset, discusses estimation issues given the nature of the data and presents panel regression results that allow us to make possible inferences regarding which patient, disease, genomic and treatment characteristics explain variation in health expenditure.

Suggested Citation

  • Paula K. Lorgelly & Brett Doble & Rachel J. Knott, 2016. "Realising the Value of Linked Data to Health Economic Analyses of Cancer Care: A Case Study of Cancer 2015," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 139-154, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:pharme:v:34:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s40273-015-0343-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s40273-015-0343-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s40273-015-0343-2
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Randall P. Ellis & Denzil G. Fiebig & Meliyanni Johar & Glenn Jones & Elizabeth Savage, 2013. "Explaining Health Care Expenditure Variation: Large‐Sample Evidence Using Linked Survey And Health Administrative Data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(9), pages 1093-1110, September.
    2. Borislava Mihaylova & Andrew Briggs & Anthony O'Hagan & Simon G. Thompson, 2011. "Review of statistical methods for analysing healthcare resources and costs," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(8), pages 897-916, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:pharme:v:35:y:2017:i:7:d:10.1007_s40273-017-0505-5 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:pharme:v:34:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s40273-015-0343-2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.