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Housewife, “gold miss,” and equal: the evolution of educated women’s role in Asia and the U.S

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  • Jisoo Hwang

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Abstract

The fraction of U.S. college graduate women who ever marry has increased relative to less educated women since the mid-1970s. In contrast, college graduate women in developed Asian countries have had decreased rates of marriage, so much so that the term “Gold Misses” has been coined to describe them. This paper argues that the interaction of rapid economic growth in Asia combined with the intergenerational transmission of gender attitudes causes the “Gold Miss” phenomenon. I present a simple dynamic model then test its implications using U.S. and Asian data on marriage and time use. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Jisoo Hwang, 2016. "Housewife, “gold miss,” and equal: the evolution of educated women’s role in Asia and the U.S," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(2), pages 529-570, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:29:y:2016:i:2:p:529-570
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-015-0571-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:dyncon:v:90:y:2018:i:c:p:171-193 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:labeco:v:52:y:2018:i:c:p:132-146 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Haaland, Venke Furre & Rege, Mari & Telle, Kjetil & Votruba, Mark, 2018. "The intergenerational transfer of the employment gender gap," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 132-146.
    4. Charles Kenny, Dev Patel, 2017. "Gender Laws, Values, and Outcomes: Evidence from the World Values Survey - Working Paper 452," Working Papers 452, Center for Global Development.
    5. You, Jing & Yi, Xuejie & Chen, Meng, 2016. "Love, Life, and “Leftover Ladies” in Urban China," MPRA Paper 70494, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. repec:eee:jcecon:v:46:y:2018:i:4:p:966-987 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Marriage; Education; Female labor force participation; Cultural transmission; J12; D10; Z10;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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