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Immigrants at new destinations: how they fare and why

  • Anabela Carneiro
  • Natércia Fortuna
  • José Varejão

    ()

Using matched employer-employee data, we identify the determinants of immigrants’ earnings in the Portuguese labor market. Results previously reported for countries with a long tradition of hosting migrants are also valid in a new destination country. Two-thirds of the gap is attributable to match-specific and employer characteristics. Occupational downgrading and segregation into low-wage workplaces are two major causes behind the wage gap.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-011-0387-3
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 1165-1185

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:25:y:2012:i:3:p:1165-1185
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