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The changing situation of labor market entrants in Germany
[Die veränderliche Situation für Berufseinsteiger in Deutschland]

Author

Listed:
  • Mario Reinhold

    (Leibniz Universität Hannover)

  • Stephan Thomsen

    (Leibniz Universität Hannover)

Abstract

Concurrently with a steady increase of the supply of college educated workers, recent evidence for the U.S. indicated a decline in the demand for and the real wages of this group after 2000. We investigate empirically, whether there has been a similar trend in Germany. Based on comprehensive, long-run administrative data for the years 1975 to 2010, we use a set of employment indicators to analyze labor market patterns of job market entrants. Besides consideration of the developments of education attainment and wages over time, we put a particular focus on changes of the task composition, the chances of entering top-paying jobs, entry wages and wage growth, and skill premia over time. To allow for a detailed analysis, we distinguish four education groups. The empirical picture shows that since the year 2000 job entrants with higher education have experienced decreasing employment shares in top-paying positions. Moreover, starting wages and wage growth have both decreased until the end of the observation period, too. A reason for this has been the substitution of jobs that were formerly executed by lower qualifications. Our findings reveal similarities between Germany and the U.S. in terms of some declining fortunes of the young. However, whereas in the U.S. college educated workers have been affected, the results indicate that in Germany the medium-skilled and low-skilled have been particularly impaired.

Suggested Citation

  • Mario Reinhold & Stephan Thomsen, 2017. "The changing situation of labor market entrants in Germany [Die veränderliche Situation für Berufseinsteiger in Deutschland]," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 50(1), pages 161-174, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jlabrs:v:50:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s12651-017-0227-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s12651-017-0227-3
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    3. Pfeiffer, Friedhelm & Stichnoth, Holger, 2018. "Fiskalische und individuelle Nettoerträge und Renditen von Bildungsinvestitionen im jungen Erwachsenenalter," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-043, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    4. Golo Henseke, 2019. "Against the Grain? Assessing Graduate Labour Market Trends in Germany Through a Task-Based Indicator of Graduate Jobs," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 141(2), pages 809-840, January.
    5. Heigle, Julia & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2020. "Langfristige Wirkungen eines nicht abgeschlossenen Studiums auf individuelle Arbeitsmarktergebnisse und die allgemeine Lebenszufriedenheit," ZEW Discussion Papers 20-004, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    6. Thomsen, Stephan L, 2018. "Die Rolle der Computerisierung und Digitalisierung für Beschäftigung und Einkommen," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-645, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.

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