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Response time and click position: cheap indicators of preferences

Listed author(s):
  • Fadong Chen

    ()

    (University of Konstanz
    Thurgau Institute of Economics
    University of Konstanz)

  • Urs Fischbacher

    ()

    (University of Konstanz
    Thurgau Institute of Economics)

Abstract This paper investigates how process data like response time and click position relates to economic decisions. We use a social value orientation experiment, which can be considered as a prototypical multi-attribute decision problem. We find that in the social value orientation task more individualistic subjects have shorter response times than prosocial subjects. Individualistic subjects click more often on their own payoffs than on the others’ payoffs, and they click more often on their own payoffs than prosocial subjects. Moreover, the response time information and the click position information are complementary in explaining subjects’ preferences. These results show that response times and click positions can be used as indicators of people’s preferences.

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File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s40881-016-0026-6
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Article provided by Springer & Economic Science Association in its journal Journal of the Economic Science Association.

Volume (Year): 2 (2016)
Issue (Month): 2 (November)
Pages: 109-126

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jesaex:v:2:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s40881-016-0026-6
DOI: 10.1007/s40881-016-0026-6
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