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Search Dynamics in Consumer Choice under Time Pressure: An Eye-Tracking Study

  • Elena Reutskaja
  • Rosemarie Nagel
  • Colin F. Camerer
  • Antonio Rangel

We study decisions that involve choosing between different numbers of options under time pressure using eye-tracking to monitor the search process of the subjects. We find that subjects are quite adept at optimizing within the set of items that they see, that the initial search process is random in value, that subjects use a stopping rule to terminate the search process that combines features of optimal search and satisficing, and that subjects search more often in certain focal regions of the display, which leads to choice biases. (JEL C91, D12, M31)

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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 101 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 900-926

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:101:y:2011:i:2:p:900-926
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