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Mutual advantage, conventions and team reasoning

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  • Robert Sugden

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Abstract

This paper proposes a conception of mutual advantage as a motivation for cooperative behaviour. This motivation is contrasted with the 'emotional' reciprocity that is represented in current theories of social preferences. The paper explores parallels between mutual advantage and Humean analyses of convention, and between mutual advantage and theories of team reasoning.
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Suggested Citation

  • Robert Sugden, 2011. "Mutual advantage, conventions and team reasoning," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 58(1), pages 9-20, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:inrvec:v:58:y:2011:i:1:p:9-20
    DOI: 10.1007/s12232-011-0114-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ernst Fehr & Klaus M. Schmidt, 1999. "A Theory of Fairness, Competition, and Cooperation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 817-868.
    2. Bruni, Luigino & Sugden, Robert, 2008. "Fraternity: Why The Market Need Not Be A Morally Free Zone," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(01), pages 35-64, March.
    3. Dufwenberg, Martin & Kirchsteiger, Georg, 2004. "A theory of sequential reciprocity," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 268-298, May.
    4. Sugden, Robert & Zamarron, Ignacio E., 2006. "Finding the key: The riddle of focal points," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 609-621, October.
    5. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
    6. Rabin, Matthew, 1993. "Incorporating Fairness into Game Theory and Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1281-1302, December.
    7. Sugden, Robert, 1984. "Reciprocity: The Supply of Public Goods through Voluntary Contributions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(376), pages 772-787, December.
    8. Berg Joyce & Dickhaut John & McCabe Kevin, 1995. "Trust, Reciprocity, and Social History," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 122-142, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sergio Beraldo, 2015. "On the economic relevance of the principle of gratuitousness," International Journal of Happiness and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(3), pages 204-215.
    2. Pietro Battiston & Simona Gamba & Matteo Rizzolli & Valentina Rotondi, 2018. "Lies have long legs. Cheating, public scrutiny and loyalty in teams," Econometica Working Papers wp67, Econometica.
    3. repec:eee:jbrese:v:88:y:2018:i:c:p:550-559 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Guilhem Lecouteux, 2018. "What Does 'We' Want? Team Reasoning, Game Theory, and Unselfish Behaviours," GREDEG Working Papers 2018-17, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    5. repec:spr:inrvec:v:64:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s12232-017-0278-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Graf Lambsdorff, Johann & Giamattei, Marcus & Werner, Katharina & Schubert, Manuel, 2016. "Emotion vs. cognition - Experimental evidence on cooperation from the 2014 Soccer World Cup," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-72-16, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mutual advantage; Reciprocity; Team reasoning; C72 (non-cooperative games); D03 (behavioural economics); D63 (equity justice inequality and other normative criteria);

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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