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Environmental effects of intensification of agriculture: livestock production and regulation

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  • Ujjayant Chakravorty
  • Donna Fisher
  • Chieko Umetsu

Abstract

This article deals with the relationship between industrialization of agriculture and the environment in developing countries. We specifically focus on livestock production and regulation. We develop a simple economic framework to demonstrate the effect of location on intensification of industrial activity in farming, and discuss this issue in the context of urbanization and economic growth in developing countries. Policy implications of the model are discussed in light of the experience of developed countries in regulating livestock pollution and other externalities. We argue that environmental problems from agricultural industrialization in developing countries may pose major challenges. In the case of livestock production, these are compounded by production intensity, high population densities in periurban and urban areas, and the generally lower public health standards. As the recent outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and avian influenza epidemics in Asia suggest, the new era of globalization and the onset of a free world trade regime points to the urgent need for developing countries to install inspection and enforcement mechanisms that ensure product safety and quality, as well as minimize the adverse effects on the environment. Copyright Springer Japan 2007

Suggested Citation

  • Ujjayant Chakravorty & Donna Fisher & Chieko Umetsu, 2007. "Environmental effects of intensification of agriculture: livestock production and regulation," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 8(4), pages 315-336, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:envpol:v:8:y:2007:i:4:p:315-336
    DOI: 10.1007/BF03353963
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Copeland, Brian R & Taylor, M Scott, 1995. "Trade and Transboundary Pollution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(4), pages 716-737, September.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Jámbor, Attila & Balogh, Jeremiás Máté, 2020. "Az agrárkereskedelem környezeti hatásainak vizsgálata szisztematikus szakirodalmi áttekintés segítségével [Investigating environmental effects of agricultural trade through a systematic review of t," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(9), pages 930-949.
    3. Liu, Yazhou & Ji, Yueqing & Shao, Shuai & Zhong, Funing & Zhang, Ning & Chen, Yishan, 2017. "Scale of Production, Agglomeration and Agricultural Pollutant Treatment: Evidence From a Survey in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 30-45.

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