IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/ediscc/v3y2019i3d10.1007_s41885-019-00046-y.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Household Preferences for Managing Coastal Vulnerability: State vs. Federal Adaptation Fund

Author

Listed:
  • Tanvir Pavel

    (Florida International University)

  • Pallab Mozumder

    (Florida International University)

Abstract

People living in the coastal areas are highly vulnerable to the extreme weather events and climatic shocks. In this paper, we analyze households’ willingness to pay (WTP) for public adaptation funds to support proactive measures that would potentially minimize the extent of coastal vulnerability. Using split-sample dichotomous choice contingent valuation (CV) method, we investigate households’ preference for a state adaptation fund (SAF) versus a federal adaptation fund (FAF), lasting for either 5 or 10 years. We analyze more than 1200 randomly selected household responses from the counties of 10 Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States that were adversely affected by a major hurricane (Sandy). From the annual estimates of median WTP, we observe that the households are willing to pay more for SAF ($68.37) than FAF ($27.35). The findings can provide inputs for policy evaluation to minimize coastal vulnerability, particularly to decide whether similar projects should be managed at the state or federal levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Tanvir Pavel & Pallab Mozumder, 2019. "Household Preferences for Managing Coastal Vulnerability: State vs. Federal Adaptation Fund," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 281-304, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ediscc:v:3:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s41885-019-00046-y
    DOI: 10.1007/s41885-019-00046-y
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s41885-019-00046-y
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1007/s41885-019-00046-y?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John C. Whitehead & Bob Edwards & Marieke Van Willigen & John R. Maiolo & Kenneth Wilson & Kevin T. Smith, 2000. "“Heading for Higher Ground: Factors Affecting Real and Hypothetical Hurricane Evacuation Behavior,”," Working Papers 0006, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
    2. William M. Shobe & Dallas Burtraw, 2012. "Rethinking Environmental Federalism In A Warming World," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 3(04), pages 1-33.
    3. Lopez-Feldman, Alejandro, 2012. "Introduction to contingent valuation using Stata," MPRA Paper 41018, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. William F. Vásquez & Pallab Mozumder, 2017. "Willingness to Pay for Hurricane-Resistant Home Improvement Programs: a Choice Experiment in Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic United States," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 263-276, October.
    5. Craig E. Landry & Paul Hindsley & Okmyung Bin & Jamie B. Kruse & John C. Whitehead & Ken Wilson, 2011. "Weathering the Storm: Measuring Household Willingness-to-Pay for Risk-Reduction in Post-Katrina New Orleans," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 77(4), pages 991-1013, April.
    6. Jana Koerth & Athanasios T. Vafeidis & Jochen Hinkel, 2017. "Household‐Level Coastal Adaptation and Its Drivers: A Systematic Case Study Review," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 37(4), pages 629-646, April.
    7. Richert, Claire & Erdlenbruch, Katrin & Figuières, Charles, 2017. "The determinants of households' flood mitigation decisions in France - on the possibility of feedback effects from past investments," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 342-352.
    8. Alistair Munro & Shunsuke Managi, 2017. "Going Back: Radiation and Intentions to Return amongst Households Evacuated after the Great Tohoku Earthquake," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 77-93, June.
    9. Timothy C. Haab & Kenneth E. McConnell, 2002. "Valuing Environmental and Natural Resources," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2427.
    10. Lawrence H. Goulder & Robert N. Stavins, 2011. "Challenges from State-Federal Interactions in US Climate Change Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 253-257, May.
    11. Laura O. Taylor & Ronald G. Cummings, 1999. "Unbiased Value Estimates for Environmental Goods: A Cheap Talk Design for the Contingent Valuation Method," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 649-665, June.
    12. Davlasheridze, Meri & Fisher-Vanden, Karen & Allen Klaiber, H., 2017. "The effects of adaptation measures on hurricane induced property losses: Which FEMA investments have the highest returns?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 93-114.
    13. Daniel R. Petrolia & Matthew G. Interis & Joonghyun Hwang, 2014. "America's Wetland? A National Survey of Willingness to Pay for Restoration of Louisiana's Coastal Wetlands," Marine Resource Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 17-37.
    14. Christian Unterberger, 2018. "How Flood Damages to Public Infrastructure Affect Municipal Budget Indicators," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 5-20, April.
    15. Wallace E. Oates & Wallace E. Oates, 2004. "A Reconsideration of Environmental Federalism," Chapters, in: Environmental Policy and Fiscal Federalism, chapter 7, pages 125-156, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    16. Richard Carson & Nicholas Flores & Norman Meade, 2001. "Contingent Valuation: Controversies and Evidence," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 19(2), pages 173-210, June.
    17. Shitangsu Paul & Jayant Routray, 2011. "Household response to cyclone and induced surge in coastal Bangladesh: coping strategies and explanatory variables," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 57(2), pages 477-499, May.
    18. Timo Goeschl & Shunsuke Managi, 2019. "Public in-Kind Relief and Private Self-Insurance," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 3-21, April.
    19. Timothy J. Goodspeed, 2013. "Decentralization and Natural Disasters," CESifo Working Paper Series 4179, CESifo.
    20. Williams, Roberton C., 2012. "Growing state–federal conflicts in environmental policy: The role of market-based regulation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 1092-1099.
    21. Creel, Michael D & Loomis, John B, 1991. "Confidence Intervals for Welfare Measures with Application to a Problem of Truncated Counts," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 370-373, May.
    22. Milou Kievik & Jan Gutteling, 2011. "Yes, we can: motivate Dutch citizens to engage in self-protective behavior with regard to flood risks," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 59(3), pages 1475-1490, December.
    23. Timothy Park & John B. Loomis & Michael Creel, 1991. "Confidence Intervals for Evaluating Benefits Estimates from Dichotomous Choice Contingent Valuation Studies," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 67(1), pages 64-73.
    24. Ivehammar, Pernilla, 2009. "The Payment Vehicle Used in CV Studies of Environmental Goods Does Matter," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 34(3), pages 1-14, December.
    25. Cameron, Trudy Ann, 1988. "A new paradigm for valuing non-market goods using referendum data: Maximum likelihood estimation by censored logistic regression," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 355-379, September.
    26. Stefan Hochrainer-Stigler & JoAnne Linnerooth-Bayer & Junko Mochizuki, 2019. "Flood Proofing Low-Income Houses in India: an Application of Climate-Sensitive Probabilistic Benefit-Cost Analysis," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 23-38, April.
    27. Yue Ge & Walter Gillis Peacock & Michael K. Lindell, 2011. "Florida Households’ Expected Responses to Hurricane Hazard Mitigation Incentives," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 31(10), pages 1676-1691, October.
    28. Richard Carson & Theodore Groves, 2007. "Incentive and informational properties of preference questions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 37(1), pages 181-210, May.
    29. Teun Terpstra, 2011. "Emotions, Trust, and Perceived Risk: Affective and Cognitive Routes to Flood Preparedness Behavior," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 31(10), pages 1658-1675, October.
    30. P. Wilner Jeanty, 2007. "Constructing Krinsky and Robb Confidence Interval for Mean and Median WTP Using Stata," North American Stata Users' Group Meetings 2007 8, Stata Users Group, revised 30 Aug 2007.
    31. Howard Kunreuther & Mark Pauly, 2006. "Rules rather than discretion: Lessons from Hurricane Katrina," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 101-116, September.
    32. Richert, Claire & Erdlenbruch, Katrin & Figuières, Charles, 2017. "The determinants of households' flood mitigation decisions in France - on the possibility of feedback effects from past investments," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 342-352.
    33. Howard Kunreuther & Mark Pauly, 2006. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: Lessons from Hurricane Katrina," NBER Working Papers 12503, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Orkideh Gharehgozli & Peyman Nayebvali & Amir Gharehgozli & Zaman Zamanian, 2020. "Impact of COVID-19 on the Economic Output of the US Outbreak’s Epicenter," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 561-573, October.
    2. George Halkos & Antonis Skouloudis & Chrisovalantis Malesios & Nikoleta Jones, 2020. "A Hierarchical Multilevel Approach in Assessing Factors Explaining Country-Level Climate Change Vulnerability," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(11), pages 1-14, May.
    3. Ivan Petkov, 2023. "Public Investment in Hazard Mitigation: Effectiveness and the Role of Community Diversity," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 33-92, March.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Gordillo, Fernando & Elsasser, Peter & Günter, Sven, 2019. "Willingness to pay for forest conservation in Ecuador: Results from a nationwide contingent valuation survey in a combined “referendum” – “Consequential open-ended” design," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 28-39.
    2. Robert J. Johnston & Kevin J. Boyle & Wiktor (Vic) Adamowicz & Jeff Bennett & Roy Brouwer & Trudy Ann Cameron & W. Michael Hanemann & Nick Hanley & Mandy Ryan & Riccardo Scarpa & Roger Tourangeau & Ch, 2017. "Contemporary Guidance for Stated Preference Studies," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(2), pages 319-405.
    3. Catherine L. Kling & Daniel J. Phaneuf & Jinhua Zhao, 2012. "From Exxon to BP: Has Some Number Become Better Than No Number?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(4), pages 3-26, Fall.
    4. Richard T. Carson, 2011. "Contingent Valuation," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2489.
    5. Paul Mwebaze & Jeff Bennett & Nigel W. Beebe & Gregor J. Devine & Paul Barro, 2018. "Economic Valuation of the Threat Posed by the Establishment of the Asian Tiger Mosquito in Australia," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 71(2), pages 357-379, October.
    6. Gebreegziabher, Z. & Mekonnen, A. & Beyene, A.D. & Hagos, F., 2018. "Valuation of access to irrigation water in rural Ethiopia: application of choice experiment and contingent valuation methods," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277168, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Hermann Donfouet & P. Jeanty & P.-A. Mahieu, 2014. "Dealing with internal inconsistency in double-bounded dichotomous choice: an application to community-based health insurance," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 317-328, February.
    8. Polis, Hilary Jacqueline & Dreyer, Stacia Jeanne & Jenkins, Lekelia Danielle, 2017. "Public Willingness to Pay and Policy Preferences for Tidal Energy Research and Development: A Study of Households in Washington State," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 213-225.
    9. Ajzenman, Nicolás & Balza, Lenin & Bejarano, Hernan & De Los Rios, Camilo & Gómez Parra, Nicolás, 2023. "Seemingly irrelevant factors and willingness to block polluting investments," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 13325, Inter-American Development Bank.
    10. repec:ken:wpaper:0603 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Bosworth Ryan & Taylor Laura O., 2012. "Hypothetical Bias in Choice Experiments: Is Cheap Talk Effective at Eliminating Bias on the Intensive and Extensive Margins of Choice?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-28, December.
    12. Sardana, Kavita, 2019. "Tourists' Willingness to Pay for Restoration of Traditional Agro-forest Ecosystems Providing Biodiversity: Evidence from India," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 362-372.
    13. Lyssenko, Nikita & Martinez-Espineira, Roberto, 2009. "`Been there done that': Disentangling option value effects from user heterogeneity when valuing natural resources with a use component," MPRA Paper 21976, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 08 Apr 2010.
    14. Catherine M.H. Keske & Greta Lohman & John B. Loomis, 2013. "Do Respondents Report Willingness-to-Pay on a per Person or per Group Basis? A High Mountain Recreation Example," Tourism Economics, , vol. 19(1), pages 133-145, February.
    15. Ben Gilbert & Alexander James & Jason F. Shogren, 2018. "Corporate apology for environmental damage," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 56(1), pages 51-81, February.
    16. Jantsje M. Mol & W. J. Wouter Botzen & Julia E. Blasch & Hans de Moel, 2020. "Insights into Flood Risk Misperceptions of Homeowners in the Dutch River Delta," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 40(7), pages 1450-1468, July.
    17. Daniel R. Petrolia & Matthew G. Interis & Joonghyun Hwang, 2018. "Single-Choice, Repeated-Choice, and Best-Worst Scaling Elicitation Formats: Do Results Differ and by How Much?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 69(2), pages 365-393, February.
    18. William M. Shobe & Dallas Burtraw, 2012. "Rethinking Environmental Federalism In A Warming World," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 3(04), pages 1-33.
    19. Craig E. Landry & Dylan Turner & Daniel Petrolia, 2021. "Flood Insurance Market Penetration and Expectations of Disaster Assistance," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 79(2), pages 357-386, June.
    20. Funahashi, Hiroaki & Shibli, Simon & Sotiriadou, Popi & Mäkinen, Jarmo & Dijk, Bake & De Bosscher, Veerle, 2020. "Valuing elite sport success using the contingent valuation method: A transnational study," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 548-562.
    21. Ndebele, Tom & Forgie, Vicky, 2017. "Estimating the economic benefits of a wetland restoration programme in New Zealand: A contingent valuation approach," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 75-89.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:ediscc:v:3:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s41885-019-00046-y. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.