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Proximity of Couples to Parents: Influences of Gender, Labor Market, and Family

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  • Tak Chan

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  • John Ermisch

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Abstract

We use household survey data from the UK to study how close middle-aged men and women in partnerships live to their parents and their partner’s parents. We find a slight tendency for couples to live closer to the woman’s parents than the man’s. This tendency is more pronounced among couples in which neither partner has a college degree and in which there is a child. In other respects, proximity to parents is gender-neutral, with the two partners having equal influence on intergenerational proximity. Better-educated couples live farther from their parents. And although certain family characteristics matter, intergenerational proximity is primarily driven by factors affecting mobility over long distances, which are mainly associated with the labor market, as opposed to gender or family circumstances. Copyright Population Association of America 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Tak Chan & John Ermisch, 2015. "Proximity of Couples to Parents: Influences of Gender, Labor Market, and Family," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(2), pages 379-399, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:52:y:2015:i:2:p:379-399
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-015-0379-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Katrine Løken & Kjell Lommerud & Shelly Lundberg, 2013. "Your Place or Mine? On the Residence Choice of Young Couples in Norway," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(1), pages 285-310, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0587-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Tak Wing Chan, 2017. "Social Mobility and the Wellbeing of Individuals," DoQSS Working Papers 17-01, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.

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