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Is the Demographic Dividend an Education Dividend?

Author

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  • Jesús Crespo Cuaresma

    ()

  • Wolfgang Lutz

    ()

  • Warren Sanderson

    ()

Abstract

The effect of changes in age structure on economic growth has been widely studied in the demography and population economics literature. The beneficial effect of changes in age structure after a decrease in fertility has become known as the “demographic dividend.” In this article, we reassess the empirical evidence on the associations among economic growth, changes in age structure, labor force participation, and educational attainment. Using a global panel of countries, we find that after the effect of human capital dynamics is controlled for, no evidence exists that changes in age structure affect labor productivity. Our results imply that improvements in educational attainment are the key to explaining productivity and income growth and that a substantial portion of the demographic dividend is an education dividend. Copyright The Author(s) 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Wolfgang Lutz & Warren Sanderson, 2014. "Is the Demographic Dividend an Education Dividend?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(1), pages 299-315, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:51:y:2014:i:1:p:299-315
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-013-0245-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David E. BLOOM & Michael KUHN & Klaus PRETTNER, 2017. "Africa’s Prospects for Enjoying a Demographic Dividend," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 83(1), pages 63-76, March.
    2. repec:dem:demres:v:36:y:2017:i:48 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Crespo Cuaresma, Jesus & Loichinger, Elke & Vincelette, Gallina A., 2016. "Aging and income convergence in Europe: A survey of the literature and insights from a demographic projection exercise," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 4-17.
    4. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0585-z is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Philippe Bocquier & Rafael Costa, 2015. "Which transition comes first? Urban and demographic transitions in Belgium and Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(48), pages 1297-1332, December.
    6. David E. Bloom & Michael Kuhn & Klaus Prettner, 2016. "Africa’s Prospects for Enjoying a Demographic Dividend," VID Working Papers 1604, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.
    7. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0654-z is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eee:joecag:v:8:y:2016:i:c:p:19-27 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Wongboonsin, Kua & Phiromswad, Piyachart, 2017. "Searching for empirical linkages between demographic structure and economic growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 364-379.
    10. Crespo Cuaresma, Jesus & Lábaj, Martin & Pružinský, Patrik, 2014. "Prospective ageing and economic growth in Europe," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 3(C), pages 50-57.
    11. Gemma Abio Roig & Concepció Patxot Cardoner & Miguel Sánchez-Romero & Guadalupe Souto Nieves, 2015. "The Welfare State and the demographic dividend: A cross-country comparison," UB Economics Working Papers 2015/332, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    12. repec:spr:series:v:9:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13209-017-0164-y is not listed on IDEAS

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