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On the validity of retrospective assessments of pregnancy intention

Author

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  • Ted Joyce
  • Robert Kaestner

    ()

  • Sanders Korenman

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Ted Joyce & Robert Kaestner & Sanders Korenman, 2002. "On the validity of retrospective assessments of pregnancy intention," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(1), pages 199-213, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:39:y:2002:i:1:p:199-213
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2002.0006
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.2002.0006
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Aigner, Dennis J., 1973. "Regression with a binary independent variable subject to errors of observation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 49-59, March.
    2. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1987:77:7:823-825_5 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Adam Looney & Day Manoli, 2016. "Are There Returns to Experience at Low-Skill Jobs? Evidence from Single Mothers in the United States over the 1990s," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-255, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    2. Sara Yeatman & Christie Sennott & Steven Culpepper, 2013. "Young Women’s Dynamic Family Size Preferences in the Context of Transitioning Fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(5), pages 1715-1737, October.
    3. Wanchuan Lin & Juan Pantano, 2015. "The unintended: negative outcomes over the life cycle," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 479-508, April.
    4. Jennifer Barber & Patricia East, 2011. "Children’s Experiences After the Unintended Birth of a Sibling," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 101-125, February.
    5. Kelly Musick, 2007. "Cohabitation, nonmarital childbearing, and the marriage process," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(9), pages 249-286, April.
    6. Warren Miller & Jo Jones & David Pasta, 2016. "An implicit ambivalence-indifference dimension of childbearing desires in the National Survey of Family Growth," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(7), pages 203-242, January.
    7. Emily Smith-Greenaway & Christie Sennott, 2016. "Death and Desirability: Retrospective Reporting of Unintended Pregnancy After a Child’s Death," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 805-834, June.
    8. repec:dem:demres:v:39:y:2018:i:3 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Cheung, Chau-kiu & Lam, Ching-man & Ngai, Steven Sek-yum, 2008. "Help from the parent-teacher association to parenting efficacy: Beyond social status and informal social capital," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1134-1152, June.
    10. Nancy Reichman & Hope Corman & Kelly Noonan & Ofira Schwartz-Soicher, 2010. "Effects of prenatal care on maternal postpartum behaviors," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 171-197, June.
    11. Nancy E. Reichman & Hope Corman & Kelly Noonan & Dhaval Dave, 2006. "Typically Unobserved Variables (TUVs) and Selection into Prenatal Inputs: Implications for Estimating Infant Health Production Functions," NBER Working Papers 12004, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Magadi, Monica Akinyi & Agwanda, Alfred O. & Obare, Francis O., 2007. "A comparative analysis of the use of maternal health services between teenagers and older mothers in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS)," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(6), pages 1311-1325, March.
    13. repec:kap:jfamec:v:39:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10834-018-9577-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Nancy E. Reichman & Hope Corman & Kelly Noonan & Dhaval Dave, 2009. "Infant health production functions: what a difference the data make," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(7), pages 761-782.

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