IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/demogr/v36y1999i2p157-171.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Is there competition between breast-feeding and maternal employment?

Author

Listed:
  • Brian Roe
  • Leslie Whittington
  • Sara Fein

    ()

  • Mario Teisl

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Brian Roe & Leslie Whittington & Sara Fein & Mario Teisl, 1999. "Is there competition between breast-feeding and maternal employment?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(2), pages 157-171, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:36:y:1999:i:2:p:157-171 DOI: 10.2307/2648105
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/2648105
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Olsen, Randall J, 1994. "Fertility and the Size of the U.S. Labor Force," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 60-100, March.
    2. Harriet Orcutt Duleep & Seth Sanders, 1994. "Empirical Regularities across Cultures: The Effect of Children on Woman's Work," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 328-347.
    3. Lee, Myoung-Jae, 1995. "Semi-parametric Estimation of Simultaneous Equations with Limited Dependent Variables: A Case Study of Female Labour Supply," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(2), pages 187-200, April-Jun.
    4. Alice Nakamura & Masao Nakamura, 1994. "Predicting Female Labor Supply: Effects of Children and Recent Work Experience," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 304-327.
    5. David Shapiro & Frank L. Mott, 1994. "Long-Term Employment and Earnings of Women in Relation to Employment Behavior Surrounding the First Birth," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 248-275.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Pinka Chatterji & Kevin Frick, 2005. "Does Returning to Work After Childbirth Affect Breastfeeding Practices?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 315-335, September.
    2. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-01211575 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Resul Cesur & Joseph J. Sabia & Inas Rashad Kelly & Muzhe Yang, 2017. "The effect of breastfeeding on young adult wages: new evidence from the add health," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 25-51, March.
    4. Warn N. Lekfuangfu & Nattavudh Powdthavee & Andrew E. Clark & George Ward, 2015. "Early Maternal Employment and Non-cognitive Outcomes in Early Childhood and Adolescence: Evidence from British Birth Cohort Data," PSE Working Papers halshs-01223336, HAL.
    5. Miki Kobayashi & Emiko Usui, 2017. "Breastfeeding practices and parental employment in Japan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 579-596, June.
    6. Huang, Rui & Yang, Muzhe, 2015. "Paid maternity leave and breastfeeding practice before and after California's implementation of the nation's first paid family leave program," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 45-59.
    7. Guertzgen, Nicole & Hank, Karsten, 2014. "Maternity leave and mothers' long-term sickness absence: Evidence from Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-109, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    8. Mandal, Bidisha & Roe, Brian Eric & Fein, Sara Beck, 2010. "The differential effects of full-time and part-time work status on breastfeeding," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(1), pages 79-86, September.
    9. Anita Kottwitz & Anja Oppermann & C. Katharina Spiess, 2016. "Parental leave benefits and breastfeeding in Germany: effects of the 2007 reform," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 859-890, December.
    10. Iryna Topolyan & Qian Wang & Xu Xu, 2015. "Peer Effects in Breastfeeding: Evidence from the IFPS II Study," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 5, pages 33-44, August.
    11. Rachel Tolbert Kimbro & Scott M. Lynch & Sara McLanahan, 2004. "The Hispanic Paradox And Breastfeeding: Does Acculturation Matter? Evidence From The Fragile Families Study," Working Papers 949, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    12. Thuan Q. Thai & Mikko Myrskylä, 2012. "Rainfall shocks, parental behavior and breastfeeding: evidence from rural Vietnam," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2012-009, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    13. Baker, Michael & Milligan, Kevin, 2008. "Maternal employment, breastfeeding, and health: Evidence from maternity leave mandates," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 871-887, July.
    14. Bidisha Mandal & Brian Roe & Sara Fein, 2014. "Work and breastfeeding decisions are jointly determined for higher socioeconomic status US mothers," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 237-257, June.
    15. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-01223336 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Vibhuti Mendiratta, 2015. "Impact of Rainfall Shocks on Child Health: Evidence from India," PSE Working Papers halshs-01211575, HAL.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:36:y:1999:i:2:p:157-171. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.