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Men matter: Additive and interactive gendered preferences and reproductive behavior in kenya


  • F. Dodoo



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Suggested Citation

  • F. Dodoo, 1998. "Men matter: Additive and interactive gendered preferences and reproductive behavior in kenya," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(2), pages 229-242, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:35:y:1998:i:2:p:229-242
    DOI: 10.2307/3004054

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. George J. Borjas, 2006. "Making it in America: Social Mobility in the Immigrant Population," NBER Working Papers 12088, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kodzi, Ivy A. & Johnson, David R. & Casterline, John B., 2012. "To have or not to have another child: Life cycle, health and cost considerations of Ghanaian women," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(7), pages 966-972.
    2. Hattori, Megan Klein & Dodoo, F. Nii-Amoo, 2007. "Cohabitation, marriage, and 'sexual monogamy' in Nairobi's slums," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(5), pages 1067-1078, March.
    3. Alexandra Tragaki & Christos Bagavos, 2014. "Male fertility in Greece," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(6), pages 137-160, July.
    4. Doss, Cheryl R. & McPeak, John G. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2005. "Perceptions of Risk within Pastoralist Households in Northern Kenya and Southern Ethiopia," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19504, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    5. Ivy Kodzi & David Johnson & John Casterline, 2010. "Examining the predictive value of fertility preferences among Ghanaian women," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(30), pages 965-984, May.
    6. Dodoo, F. Nii-Amoo & Zulu, Eliya M. & Ezeh, Alex C., 2007. "Urban-rural differences in the socioeconomic deprivation-Sexual behavior link in Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(5), pages 1019-1031, March.
    7. Kerry MacQuarrie & Jeffrey Edmeades, 2015. "Whose Fertility Preferences Matter? Women, Husbands, In-laws, and Abortion in Madhya Pradesh, India," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 34(4), pages 615-639, August.
    8. FFF1Eliya Msiyaphazi NNN1Zulu & FFF2Gloria NNN2Chepngeno, 2003. "Spousal communication about the risk of contracting HIV/AIDS in rural Malawi," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(8), pages 247-278, September.
    9. Maitra, Pushkar, 2004. "Parental bargaining, health inputs and child mortality in India," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 259-291, March.
    10. Seebens, Holger, 2006. "Bargaining over Fertility in Rural Ethiopia," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2006 25, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

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