IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/comaot/v22y2016i2d10.1007_s10588-015-9200-2.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Modeling criminality: the impact of emotions, norms and interaction structures

Author

Listed:
  • Roger Waldeck

    () (Technopole Brest-Iroise
    Université Européenne de Bretagne)

Abstract

Abstract Criminal behavior has been explained in the literature by rational or normative arguments. We propose a game theory framework of criminal behavior integrating both concepts. Specifically the modeling includes three factors, namely the gain from criminality, the adherence to a legal norm and social pressure from criminal peers. We show that criminality cannot be lower with increasing gain from criminality, lower adherence to the legal norm or higher social pressure from criminal peers. Finally, we observe by agent-based simulations that small local interaction structures lead to spatial segregation in criminality in the case where a polymorphic equilibrium is expected.

Suggested Citation

  • Roger Waldeck, 2016. "Modeling criminality: the impact of emotions, norms and interaction structures," Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 135-160, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:comaot:v:22:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s10588-015-9200-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s10588-015-9200-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10588-015-9200-2
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote & José A. Scheinkman, 1996. "Crime and Social Interactions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 507-548.
    2. Jens Ludwig & Greg J. Duncan & Paul Hirschfield, 2001. "Urban Poverty and Juvenile Crime: Evidence from a Randomized Housing-Mobility Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 655-679.
    3. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Dawes, Robyn M & Thaler, Richard H, 1988. "Anomalies: Cooperation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 187-197, Summer.
    5. Tversky, Amos & Kahneman, Daniel, 1992. "Advances in Prospect Theory: Cumulative Representation of Uncertainty," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 297-323, October.
    6. Grauwin, Sébastian & Goffette-Nagot, Florence & Jensen, Pablo, 2012. "Dynamic models of residential segregation: An analytical solution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 124-141.
    7. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce I. Sacerdote & Jose A. Scheinkman, 2003. "The Social Multiplier," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 345-353, 04/05.
    8. Colin F. Camerer & George Loewenstein & Drazen Prelec, 2004. "Neuroeconomics: Why Economics Needs Brains," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(3), pages 555-579, October.
    9. Sebastian Grauwin & Florence Goffette-Nagot & Pablo Jensen, 2012. "Dynamic models of residential segregation: An analytical solution," Post-Print halshs-00733842, HAL.
    10. Joshua M. Epstein, 1997. "Zones of Cooperation in Demographic Prisoner's Dilemma," Working Papers 97-12-094, Santa Fe Institute.
    11. Denis Phan, 2005. "Cooperation and free riding with moral cost," Post-Print halshs-00105849, HAL.
    12. François Bourguignon & Jairo Nuñez & Fabio Sanchez, 2003. "A Structural Model of Crime and Inequality in Colombia," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 440-449, 04/05.
    13. Joshua M. Epstein, 1997. "Zones of Cooperation in Demographic Prisoner's Dilemma," Research in Economics 97-12-094e, Santa Fe Institute.
    14. Roger Waldeck, 2013. "Segregated Cooperation," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 16(4), pages 1-14.
    15. Duncan J. Watts & Peter Sheridan Dodds, 2007. "Influentials, Networks, and Public Opinion Formation," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(4), pages 441-458, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:comaot:v:22:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s10588-015-9200-2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Mallaigh Nolan). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.