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A hierarchical SLX model application to violent crime in Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • Donald J. Lacombe

    () (Texas Tech University)

  • Miguel Flores

    () (ITESM)

Abstract

Abstract In this paper, we develop a Bayesian Hierarchical Spatial Lag of X (SLX) spatial econometric model to examine the relationship between contextual factors associated with violence levels in Mexico over the period 2005–2010, a period in which violence in the country reached record levels. We provide local spillover estimates of relevant covariates at both levels of the hierarchy, i.e., the municipal and state levels in Mexico. We also provide a methodology to compare relevant models regarding the proper specification of the spatial weight matrix in these models.

Suggested Citation

  • Donald J. Lacombe & Miguel Flores, 2017. "A hierarchical SLX model application to violent crime in Mexico," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 58(1), pages 119-134, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:58:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0788-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-016-0788-z
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard B. Freeman, 1996. "Why Do So Many Young American Men Commit Crimes and What Might We Do about It?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 25-42, Winter.
    2. Miguel Flores & Eduardo Rodriguez-Oreggia, 2014. "Spillover Effects on Homicides across Mexican Municipalities: A Spatial Regime Model Approach," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 44(3), pages 241-262, Winter.
    3. Lance Lochner & Enrico Moretti, 2004. "The Effect of Education on Crime: Evidence from Prison Inmates, Arrests, and Self-Reports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 155-189, March.
    4. James P. LeSage & R. Kelley Pace, 2014. "The Biggest Myth in Spatial Econometrics," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(4), pages 1-33, December.
    5. James P. LeSage, 2014. "What Regional Scientists Need to Know about Spatial Econometrics," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 44(1), pages 13-32, Spring.
    6. Flores, Miguel & Rodriguez-Oreggia, Eduardo, 2014. "Spillover Effects of Homicides across Mexican Municipalities: A Spatial Regime Model Approach," MPRA Paper 56507, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lederman, Daniel & Loayza, Norman, 2002. "Inequality and Violent Crime," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(1), pages 1-40, April.
    8. Oeindrila Dube, Omar Garcia-Ponce, and Kevin Thom, 2014. "From Maize to Haze: Agricultural Shocks and the Growth of the Mexican Drug Sector - Working Paper 355," Working Papers 355, Center for Global Development.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C30 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - General

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