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The Transition to a Cash Flow Income Tax

  • Christian Keuschnigg

The paper presents a one good two country computable general equilibrium model with overlapping generations to evaluate intertemporal and international effects from tax reform. Model treatment of household and firm behavior is firmly rooted in the microeconomic theory of intertemporal choice. The paper considers the effects from the implementation of a cash flow income tax which was shown to be neutral with respect to intertemporal decisions. The paper compares the effects in closed and open economies. In solving for transition paths to new intertemporal equilibria, I also discuss the generational welfare consequences of various arrangements that affect the transition paths.

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Article provided by Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES) in its journal Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 127 (1991)
Issue (Month): II (June)
Pages: 113-140

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Handle: RePEc:ses:arsjes:1991-ii-2
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  1. Boadway, Robin & Bruce, Neil, 1984. "A general proposition on the design of a neutral business tax," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 231-239, July.
  2. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1990. "Tax harmonization and tax competition in Europe," Munich Reprints in Economics 19846, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  3. Boadway, Robin W & Bruce, Neil & Mintz, Jack M, 1983. "On the Neutrality of Flow-of-Funds Corporate Taxation," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 50(197), pages 49-61, February.
  4. Bovenberg, A.L., 1988. "The corporate tax in an intertemporal equilibrium model with imperfectly mobile capital," Other publications TiSEM feff37fb-c981-45fa-b2d8-7, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  5. Goulder, Lawrence H. & Summers, Lawrence H., 1989. "Tax policy, asset prices, and growth : A general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 265-296, April.
  6. Mutti, John & Grubert, Harry, 1985. "The taxation of capital income in an open economy: the importance of resident-nonresident tax treatment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 291-309, August.
  7. Bovenberg, A. Lans, 1986. "Capital income taxation in growing open economies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 347-376, December.
  8. Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka, 1989. "International Tax Competition and Gains from Tax Harmonization," NBER Working Papers 3152, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Bovenberg, A.L., 1986. "Capital income taxation in growing open economies," Other publications TiSEM d92d32f6-df9f-418b-bbd3-d, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
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