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Implementing a Dual Income Tax in Germany:Effects on Investment and Welfare

  • Doina Maria Radulescu
  • Michael Stimmelmayr

This paper investigates the effects of implementing a dual income tax (DIT) in Germany. We follow the reform proposal of the German Council of Economic Advisors(2003) and analyze its implications on capital formation, investment and welfare using a dynamic computable general equilibrium model. The main features of the model are an intertemporal investment model and the traditional Ramsey model on the household side. Our findings suggest that the introduction of a DIT with a proportional capital income tax rate of 30% and progressive labour income tax rates up to 35% leads to higher investments, an increased capital accumulation up to 5.8% and welfare gains of about 1% of GDP.

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Paper provided by Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich in its series Ifo Working Paper Series with number Ifo Working Papers No. 20.

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Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_20
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  1. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1991. "The vanishing harberger triangle," Munich Reprints in Economics 19842, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  2. Robert S. Chirinko, 2002. "Corporate Taxation, Capital Formation, and the Substitution Elasticity between Labor and Capital," CESifo Working Paper Series 707, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1981. "Capital income taxation, depreciation allowances and economic growth: A perfect-foresight general equilibrium model," Munich Reprints in Economics 19913, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  4. Robert Fenge & Silke Uebelmesser & Martin Werding, 2002. "Second-best Properties of Implicit Social Security Taxes: Theory and Empirical Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 743, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Fehr, Hans, 1999. "Welfare Effects of Dynamic Tax Reforms," Beiträge zur Finanzwissenschaft, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, edition 1, volume 5, number urn:isbn:9783161470165.
  6. Roger H. Gordon & Young Lee, 1999. "Do Taxes Affect Corporate Debt Policy? Evidence from US Corporate Tax Return Data," NBER Working Papers 7433, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Hamid Faruqee & Douglas Laxton & Bart Turtelboom & Peter Isard & Eswar Prasad, 1998. "Multimod Mark III: The Core Dynamic and Steady State Model," IMF Occasional Papers 164, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Michael P. Devereux & Rachel Griffith & Alexander Klemm, 2002. "Corporate income tax reforms and international tax competition," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 17(35), pages 449-495, October.
  9. Robin Boadway, 2004. "The Dual Income Tax System - An Overview," CESifo DICE Report, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 2(3), pages 03-08, October.
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