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The Geography of Internet Infrastructure: An Evolutionary Simulation Approach Based on Preferential Attachment

Author

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  • Sandra Vinciguerra

    (Urban and Regional Research Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, P.O. Box 80115, Utrecht, 3508 TC, The Netherlands, s.vinciguerra@geo.uu.nl)

  • Koen Frenken

    (Eindhoven Centre for Innovation Studies, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 80, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, k.frenken@tue.nl)

  • Marco Valente

    (Marco Valente is in the Department of Economics, University of L'Aquila, p.le del santuario 19, L'Aquila, 67040, Italy, valente.marco@gmail.com)

Abstract

In this paper, the evolution of infrastructure networks is modelled as a preferential attachment process. It is assumed that geographical distance and country borders provide barriers to link formation in infrastructure networks. The model is validated against empirical data on the European Internet infrastructure network covering 209 cities. The average path length and average clustering coefficient of the observed network are successfully simulated. Furthermore, the simulated network shows a significant correlation with the observed European Internet infrastructure network. The paper ends with a discussion on the future uses of preferential attachment models in the light of the literature on world cities and global cities.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandra Vinciguerra & Koen Frenken & Marco Valente, 2010. "The Geography of Internet Infrastructure: An Evolutionary Simulation Approach Based on Preferential Attachment," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(9), pages 1969-1984, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:47:y:2010:i:9:p:1969-1984
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Corinne Autant-Bernard & Cilem Selin Hazir, 2011. "Conceptualizing the Role of Geographical Proximity in Project Based R&D Networks: A Literature Survey," Post-Print halshs-00674345, HAL.
    2. Corinne Autant-Bernard & Cilem Selin Hazir, 2013. "Network Formation and Geography: Modelling Approaches, Underlying Conceptions, Recent and Promising Extensions," Post-Print halshs-00878953, HAL.
    3. Emmanouil Tranos & Peter Nijkamp, 2013. "The Death Of Distance Revisited: Cyber-Place, Physical And Relational Proximities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(5), pages 855-873, December.
    4. Marco Helbich & Wolfgang Brunauer & Eric Vaz & Peter Nijkamp, 2014. "Spatial Heterogeneity in Hedonic House Price Models: The Case of Austria," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, pages 390-411.
    5. César Ducruet & Laurent Beauguitte, 2014. "Spatial Science and Network Science: Review and Outcomes of a Complex Relationship," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 297-316, December.
    6. Emmanouil Tranos & Peter Nijkamp, 2014. "Digital infrastructure and physical proximity," Chapters,in: Regional Development and Proximity Relations, chapter 8, pages 267-290 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • L96 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Telecommunications

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