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The Geography of Internet Infrastructure: An evolutionary simulation approach based on preferential attachment

Author

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  • Sandra Vinciguerra

    ()

  • Koen Frenken

    ()

  • Marco Valente

    ()

Abstract

We model the evolution of infrastructure networks as a preferential attachment process. We assume that geographical distance and country borders provide barriers to link formation in infrastructure networks. The model is validated against empirical data on the European Internet infrastructure network covering 209 cities. We successfully simulate the average path length and average clustering coefficient of the observed network. Furthermore, the simulated network shows a significant correlation with the observed European Internet infrastructure network. We end with a discussion on the future uses of preferential attachment models in the light of the literature on world cities and global cities.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandra Vinciguerra & Koen Frenken & Marco Valente, 2010. "The Geography of Internet Infrastructure: An evolutionary simulation approach based on preferential attachment," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1006, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Apr 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1006
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    File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1006.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Ben Derudder & Christof Parnreiter, 2014. "Introduction: The Interlocking Network Model for Studying Urban Networks: Outline, Potential, Critiques, and Ways Forward," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 105(4), pages 373-386, September.
    2. Corinne Autant-Bernard & Cilem Selin Hazir, 2011. "Conceptualizing the Role of Geographical Proximity in Project Based R&D Networks: A Literature Survey," Post-Print halshs-00674345, HAL.
    3. Corinne Autant-Bernard & Cilem Selin Hazir, 2013. "Network Formation and Geography: Modelling Approaches, Underlying Conceptions, Recent and Promising Extensions," Post-Print halshs-00878953, HAL.
    4. César Ducruet & Laurent Beauguitte, 2014. "Spatial Science and Network Science: Review and Outcomes of a Complex Relationship," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 297-316, December.
    5. Emmanouil Tranos & Peter Nijkamp, 2014. "Digital infrastructure and physical proximity," Chapters,in: Regional Development and Proximity Relations, chapter 8, pages 267-290 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Emmanouil Tranos & Peter Nijkamp, 2013. "The Death Of Distance Revisited: Cyber-Place, Physical And Relational Proximities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(5), pages 855-873, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    complex networks; preferential attachment; geographical distance; average path length; average clustering coefficient; Quadratic Assignment Proecedure; Internet; world cities; global cities;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • L96 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Telecommunications

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