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Changes in Earnings Instability and Job Loss

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  • Ann Huff Stevens

Abstract

This paper examines the contribution of job loss or displacement to increasing male earnings instability between 1970 and 1991. Earnings instability increased among both displaced and not-displaced men, so changes associated with job loss cannot fully explain rising instability. Changes in the incidence and consequences of job loss did, however, add substantially to growing earnings instability and to the overall variance of earnings. There is evidence that displacement substantially raised earnings volatility for several years after job loss. That effect, combined with increased numbers of recently displaced workers in the 1980s relative to the previous decade, contributed to rising overall earnings instability.

Suggested Citation

  • Ann Huff Stevens, 2001. "Changes in Earnings Instability and Job Loss," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 55(1), pages 60-78, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:55:y:2001:i:1:p:60-78
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    File URL: http://ilr.sagepub.com/content/55/1/60.abstract
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    Cited by:

    1. Morissette, Rene & Ostrovsky, Yuri, 2008. "How Do Families and Unattached Individuals Respond to Layoffs? Evidence from Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2008304e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Shin, Donggyun & Solon, Gary, 2011. "Trends in men's earnings volatility: What does the Panel Study of Income Dynamics show?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 973-982, August.
    3. Kristiina Huttunen & Jenni Kellokumpu, 2016. "The Effect of Job Displacement on Couples' Fertility Decisions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(2), pages 403-442.
    4. Riphahn, Regina T. & Schnitzlein, Daniel D., 2016. "Wage mobility in East and West Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 11-34.
    5. Robert A. Moffitt & Sisi Zhang, 2018. "Income Volatility and the PSID: Past Research and New Results," NBER Working Papers 24390, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Matthew Rutledge, 2011. "Long-Run Earnings Volatility and Health Insurance Coverage: Evidence from the SIPP Gold Standard File," Working Papers 11-35, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    7. repec:aea:apandp:v:108:y:2018:p:277-80 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:1:p:260-280 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 2009. "The Rising Instability of U.S. Earnings," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(4), pages 3-24, Fall.
    10. Morissette, Rene & Ostrovsky, Yuri, 2008. "Comment les familles et les personnes seules reagissent-elles aux licenciements? Un eclairage canadien," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2008304f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    11. Robert Moffitt & Sisi Zhang, 2018. "Income Volatility and the PSID: Past Research and New Results," Working Papers 2018-016, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

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