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Are “Involuntary†Part-Time Workers Indeed Involuntary?

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  • Leslie S. Stratton

Abstract

Theoretically, those classified by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as involuntary part-time workers are individuals who would like to work full-time but have been unable to obtain full-time employment. To empirically test the accuracy of that definition, the author employs simple probit models of employment preferences and employment opportunities estimated with data from the March 1990 Current Population Survey. The results confirm that those classified as involuntary part-time workers were indeed employed part-time “involuntarily.†Furthermore, those classified as involuntary part-time workers in 1990 were at least 50% more likely to be in the full-time labor force in 1991 than were those who were classified as voluntary part-time workers in 1990.

Suggested Citation

  • Leslie S. Stratton, 1996. "Are “Involuntary†Part-Time Workers Indeed Involuntary?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(3), pages 522-536, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:49:y:1996:i:3:p:522-536
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    Cited by:

    1. Brewer, Laura., 2004. "Youth at risk : the role of skills development in facilitating the transition to work," ILO Working Papers 993733893402676, International Labour Organization.
    2. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2015. "How Bad is Involuntary Part-time Work?," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/664, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK, revised 13 Jan 2016.
    3. Susanne Ek & Bertil Holmlund, 2015. "Part-time unemployment and optimal unemployment insurance," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 22(2), pages 201-223, April.
    4. Tomoko Kishi & Noel Gaston, 2010. "Labor Market Transitions for Female Workers in Japan: The Role of Global Competition," Chapters, in: Noel Gaston & Ahmed M. Khalid (ed.), Globalization and Economic Integration, chapter 11, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Etienne Lalé, 2018. "The welfare effects of involuntary part-time work," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(1), pages 183-205.
    6. Michail Veliziotis & Manos Matsaganis & Alexandros Karakitsios, 2015. "Involuntary part-time employment: perspectives from two European labour markets," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/02, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    7. Susanne Ek & Bertil Holmlund, 2011. "Part-Time Unemployment and Optimal Unemployment Insurance," CESifo Working Paper Series 3370, CESifo Group Munich.

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