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The Effect of Selected Sociodemographic Characteristics on Daily Travel-Activity Behavior

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  • E I Pas

    (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27706, USA)

Abstract

The hypothesis that daily travel-activity behavior is influenced by the role, life-cycle, and life-style attributes of individuals and households is examined. Daily travel-activity behavior is described by a five-state categorical variable which is defined by analytical classification of a sample of daily travel-activity patterns. The explanatory variables used in this study are age, marital status, gender, employment status, education level, presence of young children, auto-ownership, income, and residential density. Parametric maximum likelihood models of multiway contingency tables are used to test the hypothesized relationships. The statistical analyses confirm that personal daily travel-activity behavior is significantly influenced by the role, life-cycle, and life-style characteristics of individuals and their households. The statistical results also demonstrate that specific sociodemographically defined segments of the urban travel market have differential likelihoods of undertaking particular daily travel-activity patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • E I Pas, 1984. "The Effect of Selected Sociodemographic Characteristics on Daily Travel-Activity Behavior," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 16(5), pages 571-581, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:envira:v:16:y:1984:i:5:p:571-581
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Smart, 2015. "A nationwide look at the immigrant neighborhood effect on travel mode choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 189-209, January.
    2. van Wissen, Leo J., 1991. "A Model of Household Interactions In Activity Patterns," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt46q1c44f, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Golob, Thomas F., 1999. "A Simultaneous Model of Household Activity Participation and Trip Chain Generation," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt0w16g0x2, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Golob, Thomas F. & McNally, Michael G., 1997. "A model of activity participation and travel interactions between household heads," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 177-194, June.
    5. Joh, Chang-Hyeon & Arentze, Theo & Hofman, Frank & Timmermans, Harry, 2002. "Activity pattern similarity: a multidimensional sequence alignment method," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 385-403, June.
    6. Ryuichi Kitamura, 2009. "Life-style and travel demand," Transportation, Springer, vol. 36(6), pages 679-710, November.
    7. Bhat, Chandra R., 1997. "Work travel mode choice and number of non-work commute stops," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 41-54, February.
    8. Vij, Akshay & Gorripaty, Sreeta & Walker, Joan L., 2017. "From trend spotting to trend ’splaining: Understanding modal preference shifts in the San Francisco Bay Area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 238-258.
    9. Veronique Van Acker & Frank Witlox, 2005. "Exploring the relationship between land-use system and travel behaviour - some first findings," ERSA conference papers ersa05p601, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Bowman, J. L. & Ben-Akiva, M. E., 2001. "Activity-based disaggregate travel demand model system with activity schedules," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-28, January.
    11. Siyu Li & Der-Horng Lee, 2017. "Learning daily activity patterns with probabilistic grammars," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 49-68, January.
    12. Kevin Krizek, 2003. "Neighborhood services, trip purpose, and tour-based travel," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 387-410, November.
    13. Goran Vuk & John L. Bowman & Andrew Daly & Stephane Hess, 2016. "Impact of family in-home quality time on person travel demand," Transportation, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 705-724, July.
    14. Pitombo, C.S. & Kawamoto, E. & Sousa, A.J., 2011. "An exploratory analysis of relationships between socioeconomic, land use, activity participation variables and travel patterns," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 347-357, March.
    15. Golob, Thomas F., 1996. "A Model of Household Demand for Activity Participation and Mobility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt00g9770f, University of California Transportation Center.
    16. Golob, Thomas F. & Bradley, Mark A. & Polak, John W., 1995. "Travel and Activity Participation as Influenced by Car Availability and Use," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9jt3t8v1, University of California Transportation Center.
    17. Golob, Thomas F., 2000. "A simultaneous model of household activity participation and trip chain generation," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 355-376, June.
    18. Golob, Thomas F., 1999. "A Simultaneous Model of Household Activity Participation and Trip Chain Generation," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6xc704kp, University of California Transportation Center.
    19. Jinhyun Hong & Qing Shen & Lei Zhang, 2014. "How do built-environment factors affect travel behavior? A spatial analysis at different geographic scales," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 419-440, May.
    20. van Wissen, Leo J., 1991. "A Model of Household Interactions In Activity Patterns," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4zw8s901, University of California Transportation Center.

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