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Religious values, secular education and development:empirical evidence from some Latin American countries

  • Luigi Aldieri

    (Department of Economics Salvatore Vinci, University of Naples Parthenope, Italy)

  • Giuseppina Autiero

    (Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Salerno, Italy)

Religion as a component of family background may transmit values that positively affect children's educational achievements. Nevertheless, in its conservative dimension religion hampers children's self-determination and may lead them not to invest in higher education. Notably religion may adapt to the cultural changes triggered by economic development and modernization, which influences the prevailing effect of religion on education. These aspects are investigated through an overlapping generations model with human capital. The hypotheses from the model are tested with probit regression using the data from some Latin American countries. The results seem to support the role of development as a force driving the process of cultural change, which can promote children's educational achievement.

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File URL: http://reaser.eu/RePec/rse/wpaper/R5_2_Aldieri_Autiero_p15_32.pdf
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Article provided by Pro Global Science Association in its journal Published in Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research.

Volume (Year): 5 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (June)
Pages: 15-32

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Handle: RePEc:rse:wpaper:v:5:y:2013:i:1:p:15-32
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  1. Giorgia Barboni & Tania Treibich, 2010. "On the Latin American Growth Paradox: A Hindsight into the Golden Age," LEM Papers Series 2010/21, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  2. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, . "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 84-10, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  3. Rachel M. McCleary & Robert J. Barro, 2006. "Religion and Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 49-72, Spring.
  4. Checchi, Daniele & Ichino, Andrea & Rustichini, Aldo, 1999. "More equal but less mobile?: Education financing and intergenerational mobility in Italy and in the US," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 351-393, December.
  5. Simon Fan, C., 2008. "Religious participation and children's education: A social capital approach," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 303-317, February.
  6. Lehrer, Evelyn L., 2005. "Young Women's Religious Affiliation and Participation as Determinants of High School Completion," IZA Discussion Papers 1818, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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