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Conflict Migration and Social Networks: Empirical Evidence from Sri Lanka

Author

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  • Giulia Lamattina

    () (Università Commerciale "Luigi Bocconi", Milano)

Abstract

Understanding the causes and consequences of conflicts is crucial to address poverty in developing countries. This paper investigates the microeconomic consequences of civil war on the labor market in Sri Lanka. The conflict influences labor market through the functioning of social networks and I exploit the variation in migration caused by the war to estimate the impact of networks on labor market outcomes. I use conflict intensity in the province of origin as an instrument for the size of the network at the destination and I find that the migrant’s probability of being employed is enhanced when his network is larger.

Suggested Citation

  • Giulia Lamattina, 2008. "Conflict Migration and Social Networks: Empirical Evidence from Sri Lanka," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(6), pages 161-194, November-.
  • Handle: RePEc:rpo:ripoec:v:98:y:2008:i:6:p:161-194
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; social network; conflict;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • Q34 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Natural Resources and Domestic and International Conflicts

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