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Statistical Science and Philosophy of Science Part 2: Shallow versus Deep Explorations


  • Deborah Mayo

    () (Virginia Polytechnic and State University Blacksburg)


Inability to clearly defend against the criticisms of frequentist methods has turned many a frequentist away from venturing into foundational battlegrounds. Conceding the distorted perspectives drawn from overly literal and radical expositions of what Fisher, Neyman, and Pearson ‘really thought’, some deny they matter to current practice. The goal of this paper is not merely to call attention to the howlers that pass as legitimate criticisms of frequentist error statistics, but also to sketch the main lines of an alternative statistical philosophy within which to better articulate the roles and value of frequentist tools.

Suggested Citation

  • Deborah Mayo, 2012. "Statistical Science and Philosophy of Science Part 2: Shallow versus Deep Explorations," Rationality, Markets and Morals, Frankfurt School Verlag, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, vol. 3(56), September.
  • Handle: RePEc:rmm:journl:v:3:y:2012:i:56

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Coleman, Eric A. & Steed, Brian C., 2009. "Monitoring and sanctioning in the commons: An application to forestry," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 2106-2113, May.
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    3. Anthony Downs, 1957. "An Economic Theory of Political Action in a Democracy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65, pages 135-135.
    4. repec:cup:apsrev:v:87:y:1993:i:03:p:702-713_10 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Gintis, Herbert, 2000. "Beyond Homo economicus: evidence from experimental economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 311-322, December.
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