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Demand for electricity and weather conditions: Nonparametric analysis

Author

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  • Ozhegov, Evgeniy

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Perm, Russian Federation)

  • Popova, Evgeniya

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Perm, Russian Federation;)

Abstract

In this paper we study the effect of weather conditions on electricity consumption in Perm region. We employ the data on consumption, air temperature, humidity and wind power for each 3 hours in 2011–2015. Using nonparametric two-step procedure, we revealed non-linear relation between electricity and temperature. We also revealed the different shape of relation for periods with switched on and switched off central heating.

Suggested Citation

  • Ozhegov, Evgeniy & Popova, Evgeniya, 2017. "Demand for electricity and weather conditions: Nonparametric analysis," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 46, pages 55-73.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0317
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    electricity consumption; outside weather; kernel estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices

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