IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/oxecpp/v56y2004i4p643-666.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Education choice, neoclassical growth, and class structure

Author

Listed:
  • Buly A. Cardak

Abstract

The evolution of income distribution is studied in a dynamic model of education choice where both public and private education are available. Public education is financed using a tax rate determined by majority voting. The analysis focuses on neoclassical growth in order to ensure tractability in identifying a steady state. Possible voting equilibria in the steady state are characterized, with steady state income distribution found to be bimodal. Public education offers higher growth to the poor in the transition to the steady state, however public education students converge to the lower mode of the income distribution. Under some conditions, universal public education offers steady state human capital superior to that available to any student in the mixed education model considered, while universal private education unconditionally offers steady state human capital superior to that of the mixed education model. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Buly A. Cardak, 2004. "Education choice, neoclassical growth, and class structure," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(4), pages 643-666, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:56:y:2004:i:4:p:643-666
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpf067
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Buly A. Cardak, 2004. "Education Choice, Endogenous Growth and Income Distribution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71, pages 57-81, February.
    2. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    3. Kaganovich, Michael & Zilcha, Itzhak, 1999. "Education, social security, and growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 289-309, February.
    4. Epple, Dennis & Romano, Richard E., 1996. "Ends against the middle: Determining public service provision when there are private alternatives," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(3), pages 297-325, November.
    5. Robert Tamura, 2001. "Teachers, Growth, and Convergence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(5), pages 1021-1059, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Growiec, Katarzyna & Growiec, Jakub, 2014. "Social Capital, Trust, And Multiple Equilibria In Economic Performance," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(02), pages 282-315, March.
    2. John Creedy, 2006. "Education Vouchers: Means Testing Versus Uniformity," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 978, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Nikos Benos, 2005. "Education Systems, Growth and Welfare," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 5-2005, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    4. Tetsuo Ono & Yuki Uchida, 2016. "Inequality and Education Choice," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 16-17, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    5. Buly A. Cardak, 2004. "Education Choice, Endogenous Growth and Income Distribution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71, pages 57-81, February.
    6. repec:beo:journl:v:62:y:2017:i:212:p:43-62 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:56:y:2004:i:4:p:643-666. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/oep .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.