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Reapplication and extension: intergenerational mobility in the United States

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  • Aughinbaugh, Alison

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  • Aughinbaugh, Alison, 2000. "Reapplication and extension: intergenerational mobility in the United States," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(6), pages 785-796, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:7:y:2000:i:6:p:785-796
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth A. Couch & Thomas A. Dunn, 1997. "Intergenerational Correlations in Labor Market Status: A Comparison of the United States and Germany," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(1), pages 210-232.
    2. Dearden, Lorraine & Machin, Stephen & Reed, Howard, 1997. "Intergenerational Mobility in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 47-66, January.
    3. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 257-298 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Altonji, Joseph G & Hayashi, Fumio & Kotlikoff, Laurence J, 1992. "Is the Extended Family Altruistically Linked? Direct Tests Using Micro Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1177-1198, December.
    5. Couch, Kenneth A. & Lillard, Dean R., 1998. "Sample selection rules and the intergenerational correlation of earnings," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 313-329, September.
    6. Attanasio, Orazio P & Browning, Martin, 1995. "Consumption over the Life Cycle and over the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1118-1137, December.
    7. Lillard, L-A & Kilburn, M-R, 1997. "Assortative Mating and Family Links in Permanent Earnings," Papers 97-02, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
    8. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of the Impact of Sample Attrition on the Second Generation of Respondents in the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 300-344.
    9. McGarry, Kathleen, 1999. "Inter vivos transfers and intended bequests," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 321-351, September.
    10. Solon, Gary, 1992. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 393-408, June.
    11. Zimmerman, David J, 1992. "Regression toward Mediocrity in Economic Stature," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 409-429, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel H. Cooper & María José Luengo-Prado, 2011. "House price growth when kids are teenagers: a path to higher intergenerational achievement?," Working Papers 11-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Kerwin Kofi Charles & Sheldon Danziger & Geng Li & Robert F. Schoeni, 2006. "Studying consumption with the Panel Study of Income Dynamics: comparisons with the Consumer Expenditure Survey and an application to the intergenerational transmission of well-being," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-16, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Tackie, Nii O. & Aboagye, Judith N. & Johnson, Gwendolyn J. & Braxton, Millicent & Hunt-Haralson, LaTanya & Wall, Gertrude D., 2013. "The Impact Of Selected Socioeconomic Factors On Asset Building In Rural Communities," Professional Agricultural Workers Journal (PAWJ), Professional Agricultural Workers Conference, vol. 1(1).
    4. Anderberg, Dan, 2007. "Self-enforcing exchange among generations: Implications for consumption and mobility," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(7), pages 1813-1827, October.
    5. Buly A. Cardak, 2004. "Education Choice, Endogenous Growth and Income Distribution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71, pages 57-81, February.
    6. Buly A. Cardak, 2004. "Ability, Education, and Income Inequality," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 6(2), pages 239-276, May.

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