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Financial Liberalisation and Currency Demand in Zambia

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  • Adam, Christopher

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of exchange rate and financial sector liberalisation measures implemented in the early 1990s on the private sector's demand for base money in Zambia. Using time-series data I show how the removal of controls on asset markets led to a permanent shift in the demand for narrow money. Linked with an increase in forecast volatility, this structural break appears to have undermined the efficacy of money-based stabilisation efforts in Zambia. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Adam, Christopher, 1999. "Financial Liberalisation and Currency Demand in Zambia," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 8(3), pages 268-306, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:8:y:1999:i:3:p:268-306
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arrau, Patricio & De Gregorio, Jose & Reinhart, Carmen M. & Wickham, Peter, 1995. "The demand for money in developing countries: Assessing the role of financial innovation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 317-340, April.
    2. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    3. Hansen, Bruce E., 1992. "Testing for parameter instability in linear models," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 517-533, August.
    4. Dolado, Juan J & Jenkinson, Tim & Sosvilla-Rivero, Simon, 1990. " Cointegration and Unit Roots," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 249-273.
    5. Adam, Christopher, 1995. "Fiscal adjustment, financial liberalization, and the dynamics of inflation: Some evidence from Zambia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 735-750, May.
    6. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501.
    7. Barr, D G & Cuthbertson, Keith, 1991. "Neoclassical Consumer Demand Theory and the Demand for Money," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(407), pages 855-876, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Buffie, Edward & Adam, Christopher & O'Connell, Stephen & Pattillo, Catherine, 2008. "Riding the wave: Monetary responses to aid surges in low-income countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(8), pages 1378-1395, November.
    2. Michaël GOUJON & Sylviane GUILLAUMONT JEANNENEY & Christopher ADAM, 2003. "Currency substitution and the transactions demand for money," Working Papers 200304, CERDI.
    3. Janvier Nkurunziza, 2004. "How Long Can Inflation Tax Compensate For The Loss Of Government Revenue In War Economies? Evidence From Burundi," Development and Comp Systems 0409065, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Christopher Adam & Michael Goujon & Sylviane Guillaumont Jeanneney, 2004. "The transactions demand for money in the presence of currency substitution: evidence from Vietnam," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(13), pages 1461-1470.
    5. Edward Buffie & Christopher Adam & Stephen O'Connell & Catherine Pattillo, 2004. "Exchange Rate Policy and the Management of Official and Private Capital Flows in Africa," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 51(s1), pages 126-160, June.
    6. Abraham Mwenda & Noah Mutoti, 2011. "Financial Sector Reforms, Bank Performance and Economic Growth: Evidence from Zambia," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 23(1), pages 60-74.
    7. Magnus Saxegaard, 2006. "Excess Liquidity and Effectiveness of Monetary Policy; Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 06/115, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Michaël GOUJON & Sylviane GUILLAUMONT JEANNENEY & Christopher ADAM, 2002. "Currency substitution and the transactions demand for money in Vietnam," Working Papers 200228, CERDI.
    9. J Benson Durham, "undated". "Time-Series Econometrics of the Real and Financial Effects of Capital Flows: Selected Cases in Africa and Southern Asia," QEH Working Papers qehwps56, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    10. Janvier Nkurunziza, 2004. "How long can inflation tax compensate for the loss Wof government revenue in war economics? Evidence from Burundi," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2004-19, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    11. Buffie, Edward F. & O'Connell, Stephen A. & Adam, Christopher, 2010. "Fiscal inertia, donor credibility, and the monetary management of aid surges," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 287-298, November.

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