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Aggregate Price Shocks and Financial Instability: A Historical Analysis

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  • Michael D. Bordo
  • Michael J. Dueker
  • David C. Wheelock

Abstract

This article presents evidence on the relationship between price and financial stability. We construct an annual index of financial conditions for the United States, 1790--1997, and estimate the effect of aggregate price shocks on the index using a dynamic ordered probit model. We find that price-level shocks contributed to financial instability during 1790--1933 and that inflation rate shocks contributed to financial instability during 1980--97. The size of the aggregate price shock needed to alter financial conditions depends on the institutional environment, but we conclude that a monetary policy focused on price stability would contribute to financial stability. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael D. Bordo & Michael J. Dueker & David C. Wheelock, 2002. "Aggregate Price Shocks and Financial Instability: A Historical Analysis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(4), pages 521-538, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:40:y:2002:i:4:p:521-538
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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