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Investment and Disinvestment Principles with Nonconstant Prices and Varying Firm Size Applied to Beef-Breeding Herds

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  • James N. Trapp

Abstract

Variable beef-breeding herd sizes are found to be optimal given cyclical beef prices. Traditional replacement theory does not allow variable firm size because unequal investment (replacement) and disinvestment (culling) rates are not possible. If firm size changes, cost of production per unit endogenously changes given a u-shaped cost curve. Optimal investment and disinvestment rules for variable firm size are developed based upon the firm's cost curve and discounted net revenue flows for a finite rolling planning horizon. Current and future investment and disinvestment decisions are linked by their mutual effect on firm size and hence production cost per unit.

Suggested Citation

  • James N. Trapp, 1986. "Investment and Disinvestment Principles with Nonconstant Prices and Varying Firm Size Applied to Beef-Breeding Herds," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 68(3), pages 691-703.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:68:y:1986:i:3:p:691-703.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1241553
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    Cited by:

    1. Aadland, David, 2004. "Cattle cycles, heterogeneous expectations and the age distribution of capital," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(10), pages 1977-2002, September.
    2. David Aadland, "undated". "The economics of cattle supply," Working Papers 2000-11, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Mitchell, James & Peel, Derrell S., 2016. "Price Determinants of Bred Cows in Oklahoma Auctions," 2016 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2016, San Antonio, Texas 230077, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    4. David Aadland & DeeVon Bailey & S. Feng, "undated". "A theoretical and empirical investigation of the supply response in the U.S. beef-cattle industry," Working Papers 2000-12, Utah State University, Department of Economics.
    5. Aadland, David, 2002. "Cattle Cycles, Expectations And The Age Distribution Of Capital," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19795, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Rosen, Sherwin & Murphy, Kevin M & Scheinkman, Jose A, 1994. "Cattle Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(3), pages 468-492, June.
    7. Ge, Wei & Kinnucan, Henry, 2016. "Dynamic analysis of the livestock inventory in Inner Mongolia," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 252723, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    8. Yeboah, Osei-Agyeman & Ofori-Boadu, Victor & Salifou, Samaila, 2009. "A Foot and Mouth Disease Induced Model of US Excess Supply of Beef," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46053, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    9. Boyer, Christopher M. & McFarlane, Zach McFarlane & Mulliniks, Travis & Griffith, Andrew P., 2018. "Investment into Developing Heifers: When Does She Become Profitable?," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274108, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. Hunnicutt Lynn & Aadland David, 2003. "Inventory Constraints in a Dynamic Model of Imperfect Competition: An Application to Beef Packing," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-24, March.

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